Sean Connolly heads up Adelaide Casino’s new restaurant

Celebrity chef Sean Connolly is leading the way on Adelaide Casino's new development with Sean's Kitchen booked to open early next month. 

On Friday, October 10, the doors will open to SKYCITY's new restaurant. Connolly has been involved with SKYCITY projects before, launching The Grill by Sean Connolly in Auckland, New Zealand, and running Astral restaurant at Sydney Casino, where he was awarded consecutive chef hats from 2007 to 2011. In 2008, Sydney Morning Herald named Connolly as Chef of the Year in their Good Food Guide

Although the space is yet to be completed, Sean's Kitchen is being touted as a world-class establishment, with many quirky interior decorations and additions. 

A museum of ham, for instance, won't be found in any other establishment.

The focus of the Casino's new restaurant is local produce, with Saskia Beer on board as well as Michael Erikson for Berkshire pork, marron from Kangaroo Island Gold, and sheep dairy products from Island Pure.

“South Australia punches well above its weight in term of fresh produce,” Connolly says in a press release, “so it made sense to open a restaurant here in partnership with Adelaide Casino. I use as much of it as I can, even in my restaurants in the east.”

Wine, too, promises to be spectacular, with the list curated by freelance wine writer Nick Ryan.

There’s capacity for 180 people at Sean’s Kitchen, divided between alfresco, upstairs and private dining spaces and a chef’s table.

Connolly has been filming the construction of the Kitchen for a TV documentary that will possibly follow the style of Under The Grill, which followed Connolly through the development and production phases of his NZ restaurant The Grill by Sean Connolly.

The chef may be a familiar television face from his 13-part SBS series My Family Kitchen (2010).

The full menu and wine list is yet to be announced; all will be revealed at the launch on Friday, October 10.

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The Adelaide Review

Room With a Grandvewe

Spend even a small amount of time with Grandvewe’s Diane Rae and you cannot help but be caught up by her vibrant energy and entertained by her many cheese tales.

A holiday in Tasmania changed Rae’s life. In 2001, she moved the family from Maleny in Queensland to Birch’s Bay in Tasmania, 40 minutes south of Hobart, to establish a vineyard. As a way to keep the weeds down between the rows of vines, she brought in dairy sheep, starting with a herd of East Friesland sheep.

The vines are gone but the sheep remain. Rae initiated a breeding program, crossing the existing East Friesland herd with the Middle Eastern Awassi breed for a hardier sheep, the Grandvewe dairy sheep breed.

Using cheesemaking skills gained from study through the University of Melbourne, Rae transformed the milk into the first wheels of Grandvewe cheese. Now, together with her daughter, co-cheesemaker Nicole Gilliver, and son, Marketing Manager Ryan Hartshorn, they make up Grandvewe Cheese, an organic farmhouse sheep milk dairy and cheesery.

Over the years, Rae has employed ‘woofers’, volunteers under the Willing Workers on Organic Farms (WWOOF) scheme. This is a program, which began in England as a weekend ‘on-farm’ experience for city slickers keen to get their hands dirty, and has been operating in Australia since 1982. They fi nd tasks that suit the woofer’s personality and interests, whether it be helping make or pack cheese, or working outside with the sheep. Rae tells the story of a French woofer working in the paddock when the restaurant became busy.

She asked him to spend the day plating cheese. “I was amazed at the presentation of the cheeseboards being delivered to customers,” she says. “I congratulated him on his attention to detail. Turns out he was a three-star Michelin chef on holiday.” Rae answered some questions about Grandvewe, below.

How does the Tasmanian climate work for sheep’s milk?
It’s the Tasmanian terroir. We have the cleanest air and it’s a good climate for growing grass. Sheep like the cold climate but don’t like getting their feet wet, so for three months of the year during winter, they are housed in the ‘Sheep Hilton’ – five-star ovine accommodation where they get bed and breakfast. If it’s a fine day they will be allowed out to wander during the day. This is also where they go to have their lambs. When lambing, each mum and bub have their own stall for a month and given time to bond. At the end of the month, the bubs are weaned on to grass and grain and mums become working mothers.

What is your favourite recipe using a Grandvewe product?
I use the White Pearl as a stuffing for baked mushrooms. I also serve White Pearl instead of tartare sauce with salmon.

What’s next for Grandvewe?
In November we have been invited to be one of 27 Tasmanian artisan producers to be represented in a new development called Brooke St Pier. This is a three-storey glass atrium on a floating pier where all the ferries leave for places like MONA, Port Arthur etc, and is designed to give a taste of Tasmania.

Does it ever feel too hard/challenging coming from a very different career?
Often, especially at the beginning. Learning how to look after sheep and creating the systems required to make it, not only work, but commercially viable. Now there are so many opportunities and being a family business with limited capital, the challenge is deciding which direction to take the business.

grandvewe.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Taste Test: Jamie’s Italian

The hoopla surrounding the arrival of Jamie’s Italian is the gastronomic equivalent of The Beatles landing in the city of churches (or Culture Club’s Rundle Mall appearance), but this Taste Test proves why Jamie’s Italian is such a global phenomenon.

The press descended on 2 King William St for the opening of Jamie’s Italian’s last week like Heston Blumenthal was personally in town to relocate The Fat Duck to Adelaide. It’s just a chain, people. Or is it? Jamie’s Italian isn’t an everyday outlet. It’s not Krispy Kreme – which admittedly also had Adelaide in a fix when its drive-through opened recently – as Jamie Oliver is probably the most famous cooking identity on the planet and in six short years, Jamie’s Italian has spread from a sole outlet in Oxford to a restaurant juggernaut with 35 locations in the UK alone. It now has 11 restaurants outside the UK, including four in Australia, with Adelaide the latest and another to open in Brisbane soon.

Jamie’s Italian is the brainchild of The Naked Chef and his mentor Gennaro Contaldo (one-half of The Two Greedy Italians). The pair bonded over their love of Italian food and years later Jamie’s Italian was born. And the results for the local incarnation are impressive. It finally opened its Adelaide doors last week with the press coverage tantamount to a royal visit (and, yes, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian did dine there last week), including a bizarre beat up over the lack of SA wine. For the record, there are SA wines on offer including the 2013 Beach Road Fiano and the 2006 Casa Freschi ‘La Signora’ Nebbiolo. The Adelaide Review was contacted about a story on a local winery’s partnership with Jamie’s Italian some months ago (which will likely be covered in a future print issue) and there will be many local Italian varietals coming soon.

Located in the historic old Westpac building, the vast space seats 175 people and is a massively impressive room with a hive of activity including the antipasto island bar – a brilliant touch, adding to the rustic charm of Jamie’s Italian. Popular music from the last 30 years blasts from the speakers (everything from Oasis to Bronski Beat – or was it The Communards? – to Muse) while the huge waiting staff runs around and the noise of chatter, waiting staff and sounds from the kitchen combine for a symphony of dining busyness and excitement. If you’re looking for a quiet Italian feast in a dark corner, Jamie’s Italian isn’t for you.

As part of a media lunch (this isn’t a review but a first impressions look at the new place since it was on Jamie’s dime. A review will appear at a later date from food reviewer Paul Wood), a range of antipasti options are displayed in front of us after a ginger mojito – where the ginger is a perfect virgin substitute for rum – kick starting the long lunch.

The highlights of the starter options include the deliciously smoky Baked Mushrooms ($15.50) with Swiss mushrooms, crispy ‘music bread’ and smoked buffalo mozzarella, as well as the delightful Fried Three-Cheese Gnocchi ($10) – the dish of the day. A recommended starter is the Fish Plank ($13.50pp) that includes beetroot-cured salmon, roasted shellfish, smoked mackerel pate, as well as aged pecorino, salad and a selection of pickles.

For the main, I chose the Vongole Tagliolini ($15.50/$26), a personal favourite pasta dish and an ideal taste test. It passes with flying colours. With a creamy white wine sauce, a nice balance of steamed sweet cockles and a fresh zing from the chilli, Jamie’s is one of the best vongole dishes I’ve tasted outside of Italy.

Dessert-wise, the tall Tutti Frutti Lemon Meringue Pie ($10.50) is the show-stopper. Appearing like a high-rise of dessert goodness, the lemon meringue is the sweet option of choice. If you’re not a meringue fan then the popular JI Epic Brownie ($10) is the go-to if you’re looking for a chocolate fudge finish (the amaretto ice cream and caramelised popcorn are nice touches to the brownie).

While the hype surrounding Jamie’s Italian has verged on embarrassing, it is the perfect rustic and casual outing for a family (Jamie’s Italian includes a children’s menu) or a large group. It is an impressive, mid-priced eatery to rival similarly-priced quality Italian old favourites such as Amalfi and Enzo’s.

*The writer was a guest of Jamie’s Italian.

jamieoliver.com/italian/australia/restaurants/adelaide

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The Adelaide Review

Moran’s Paddock

South Australia’s food regions shine in the second season of celebrity chef Matt Moran’s award-winning Foxtel show Paddock to Plate

The owner of ARIA and CHISWICK, who recently announced he will continue to run Sydney Opera House’s Opera Bar for the next decade, focuses on South Australia and Western Australia’s produce in the new season of Paddock to Plate, which screens on the Lifestyle Channel from Wednesday, September 3. Moran, whose restaurant and bar endeavours are currently all located in Sydney and Brisbane, tells The Adelaide Review an announcement is coming soon.

“I’m going to make it in a couple of weeks. Something new.”

Will it be something outside of Sydney and Brisbane?

“It could be anywhere. It might be in Adelaide, you never know? We’re really excited. It’s a great time at the moment. We’re expanding.”

The second season of Paddock to Plate features four episodes that celebrate South Australia’s food regions: the Eyre Peninsula (episode one), the Riverland (episode two), Fleurieu Peninsula (episode four) and the Barossa Valley/Adelaide Hills (episode six). Moran travels to an area of Australia to meet with farmers, producers and food identities in each episode before he cooks a meal using their produce. In the season opener, Moran experiences the diversity of the Eyre Peninsula as the former GQ Chef of the Year visits saltbush-grazing lamb in the South Australian dessert’s 41-degree heat before heading to the cooler climate of Pt Lincoln to dive with Bluefin tuna. It was this diversity that attracted him to SA.

“We shot the first series in Victoria and New South Wales last year,” Moran says. “The first time out we were thinking about keeping it close. Proximity was a big thing. With Victoria, we knew that we could get five episodes in quite easily. I’m not going to say that South Australia is the food capital of Australia, but it wouldn’t be bloody far off if you ask me. The idea, when I first came up with it for ITV, was to shoot regions, so we could make quite a few seasons of it. South Australia is very diverse.”

Moran cooks for some living food and wine legends in the upcoming Barossa episode.

“I was there for seven days dissecting it. I feel as though I know the Barossa better than anybody,” he laughs. “We went and saw Maggie Beer and I had to cook for her, which is one of the scariest things in the world. I went to a Red Angus farm and that to me was a real paddock to plate. This guy breeds them, he gets them slaughtered and then he sells them in farmers’ markets. We went to Stephen’s [Henschke] place and I cooked up lamb as the feast at the end. To cook for Stephen Henschke and drink Mount Edelstone and Hill of Grace in his backyard for his family is a bucket list for me. Barossa was a great episode. To hang out with two icons of Australian food and wine, it was pretty damn cool.”

Moran was part of Kangaroo Island’s Festival in April, where he cooked an Argentinian inspired feast to launch the festival. But KI isn’t featured in this series of Paddock to Plate.

“I thought a great series would be the islands: Kangaroo, Flinders, King and Norfolk. And I haven’t done the Limestone Coast either. It means I might come back one day.”

Sustainability is a theme that runs through the show. 

“That word is being kicked around a lot more these days. It’s not a fad. It is a reality. People want to know what they’re putting in their mouths, who’s growing it, where it comes from and how it’s looked after. Seasonality is another big thing I’m really into. When we use asparagus at ARIA Restaurant, for instance, we’re grateful that we’ve got it and thankful that we’ve got it. When we don’t have it, we’re not buying it from Brazil; we’re excited about getting it back again [when it’s in season]. That means menus change and seasonality comes into it a lot more than it used to. I built CHISWICK with a market garden next to it for one reason; the vegetables we grow, that’s what we use in the restaurant.  It makes the chefs think about seasonality.” 

Moran also breaks down stigmas in Paddock to Plate. He shows that farmed fish taste delicious plus he goes out on a duck hunt.

“I was worried about that [duck hunting]. I come from the country and I carry a gun license with me, I always have, since I was 19, for farming reasons. Duck shooting, I was a little skeptical about it. I met the guys. I met the family. It’s something they’ve been doing for 150 years. It’s part of their diet. It’s not dissimilar to me breeding lamb, killing it and eating it. What they shoot, they eat. And they proved that to me. We had a lot of fun doing it. I’m not one of those people who just go out to blast things for the hell of it, and I never have been. What they’re doing is sustainable and it’s a big part of their diet.”

Paddock to Plate screens on The Lifestyle Channel from Wednesday, September 3 (8.30pm)
mattmoran.com.au
lifestyle.com.au/tv/paddock-to-plate

 

 

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The Adelaide Review

Food For Thought: Chocolate Cake

It’s possibly one of the most popular supermarket lines of all time, and definitely one of the most timesaving inventions of the 20th century, but the ‘packet cake mix’ wasn’t the overnight success that the smiling face of Betty Crocker would have us believe.

The great depression brought with it a surplus of molasses and a very hungry America. Cake mix was developed to provide the country with a sweet fix for less fortunate times and for the very savvy John D. Duff, a way of cashing in on a sticky oversupply commodity.

Duff, on December 10 1930, lodged the first patent for what is now known as ‘packet cake mix’. His 1930s gingerbread mix consisted of equal parts flour and dehydrated molasses with sugar, shortening, salt, baking soda, powdered whole egg, ginger and cinnamon. Baking at home would now only consist of three, mind-numbing steps: add water, stir and bake.

Cake mixes continued to do well but sales would taper off when the housewives of the ‘40s and ‘50s found the simplicity of baking a cake from the packet too easy, almost to the point of undermining their role in the family kitchen. Now, several American cake mix manufactures have listened to the homemakers and developed the extra step of adding fresh eggs, a simple solution that resulted in a more superior end result and reassured housewives of their baking prowess.

The only thing missing was the icing on the cake – literally!

The further invention of ‘packet frosting’ was fully embraced by the consumerist era of the US and then, baking was completely revolutionised.

Unfortunately, the ingredient listing of today’s packet cake mixes aren’t as simple as Duff’s original 1930 recipe. This rather humble concept is now the face of some of the worst displays of additives, flavours and E-numbers on our supermarket shelves. The reassuring smiles of the all-American housewife might have got this product of convenience this far but as we start to ask what’s inside the box, one can only hope a shift towards ‘real food’ is heard, resulting in another chapter in the history of the packet cake mix.

@annabelleats

Dark Chocolate Cake Recipe

Dry cake mixes are easy to do at home and gives you complete control of the ingredients. This is a very easy but delicious chocolate cake mix that can be made in bulk and stored in the pantry until required. I serve it in four layers with whipped salted caramel in-between each one.

Dark Chocolate Cake Mix Ingredients
• 4 cups plain flour
• 4 cups light brown sugar
• 1 1/2 cups cocoa powder
• 4 teaspoons baking soda
• 2 teaspoons baking powder
• 2 teaspoons salt
• 2 teaspoons vanilla powder (if you can’t find it, add vanilla extract to the wet ingredients)

Method
1. Place all ingredients into a large mixing bowl
2. Whisk until well combined
3. Evenly decant into two large, airtight jars (should be around four-and-a-half cups of mix in each jar)
4. Label and store until required

Dark Chocolate Cake with Whipped Salted Caramel Recipe

Ingredients
• 1 jar of cake mix
• 2 cups buttermilk
• ½ cup of unsalted melted butter
• 2 eggs

Method
1. Preheat a fan forced oven to 180 degrees
2. Line and grease a cake tin with a removable base.
3. Place the jar of cake mix in a large mixing bowl
4. Lightly whisk the buttermilk, eggs and melted butter
5. Add the wet ingredients to the dry cake mix and stir until well combined
6. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean
7. Leave to rest in the tin for 15 minutes before removing and allowing to completely cool on a cake rack
8. Liberally decorate with icing or frosting as desired

Whipped Salted Caramel
• 350g light brown sugar
• 200g unsalted butter
• 1 cup of thick cream
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 200ml whipping cream
• 1 teaspoon salt

1. Bring the brown sugar, butter, cream and vanilla to a gentle boil
2. Reduce for five minutes
3. Remove from heat
4. Add the sea salt (adjust to taste) and chill in the refrigerator overnight
5. Add the whipping cream and, with an electric whisk, beat until lighter in colour and the consistency of whipped cream

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Ryo’s Noodles

With the arrival of Ryo’s Noodles – found in Hong Kong, Jakarta and Sydney – Adelaide’s pretty non-existent ramen scene is about to get a shake-up.

80 Gouger St has been refreshed since its Kawaii Fashion days. The former $2.80-shop’s front has been replaced by a wall of circular, black mesh. Ryo’s bold red logo – a striped bowl with a rainbow of noodles arching over it – stands out proudly from the black fronting. The meshed-over windows and red curtains in the doorway give the newly opened space an exclusive, secret feel.

Inside, the décor is much of the same industrial-edged design we’ve been seeing lately: exposed lightbulbs, high stools, black trimming. Specials and recommendations (“If your soup is too salty, please ask staff for less salt”) line the walls on brown paper signs.


The soup really is a salty spectacular 

Just beyond the entrance is a flight of stairs leading to an upper floor, where we’re told the noodles are made.

As Ryo’s has just opened, there is a bit of a queue; about 10 minutes’ wait for a table (couples and small groups) then 15 minutes or so for food. Considering, however, that every seat in the restaurant is filled, the speed and quality of service is very good.

We order the gyoza ($7 for five) and two of the pork soup options: ramen in soy-sauce-flavoured soup with roast pork, egg and shallots ($14.50) and ramen in miso-flavoured soup with egg, roast pork, shallots and bamboo shoots ($15).

Ryo's Noodles gyoza Adelaide 80 Gouger St

A wide sheet of nori (seaweed) lines the bowl, ready to be shredded over the meat, baby bok choy and shallots. The cloudy soup is thick and rich, heavy with salty pork flavours. The soft-boiled soy egg halves have perfectly jammy yolks. Slices of roast pork are well-cooked and soft, while the noodles are firm and springy. The whole ramen experience is delicious and moreish, but beware: the MSG come-down is pretty intense.

The gyoza are tasty, with crisp, pan-fried bases and hot pork-mince filling.

Serving sizes are very generous, so go to Ryo’s on an empty stomach. However, it is very salty fare, and Ryo’s recognise this. They welcome requests to make the soup less strong.

Over all, the quality of Ryo’s food is extremely high, with no other ramen in Adelaide close to comparing. 

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The Adelaide Review

Putting Adelaide on the food map

Since moving to Adelaide four and five years ago respectively, Chefs Duncan Welgemoed and Jock Zonfrillo have witnessed and are vocal about the exciting changes to Adelaide’s food culture. In their own words, the Restaurant Orana and Bistro Dom big kahunas take us through the local food resurgence.

ARRIVING IN ADELAIDE

Jock: I’d been living in Sydney for 10 years and there, like most of Australia, was this attitude of Adelaide being a backwater, a big country town. I moved here five years ago, drove here in a ute with all my worldly goods. At the time I was at the tail end of my second marriage – they [the family] came down in a plane, and I drove, which was a nice drive from Sydney. I’d never been here before. The first thing I saw coming into the city was a huge billboard for Caffe Primo – prawn gamberi $9.90, pretty good eh. I thought, ‘Wow. I’ve arrived in Adelaide – this is it.’ A friend of mine owns the Austral Hotel, so I did a bit of consultancy for a year. I went to Magill [Estate] after that. It was a very different experience from Sydney, and from any other city to be honest with you. Adelaide’s a very different place. The only thing I’d heard about from here was San Jose Smallgoods, because they had it in Sydney and they were good. And I knew that Maggie Beer was down here. But once I got here and into it; there’s a phenomenal wine scene, incredible ingredients and, as it turned out, geographically it’s a fantastic place for what we do [Street ADL and Orana]; in terms of native ingredients, we’re right in the heart of the country. I was able to get native ingredients 24 hours earlier than I would have on the eastern seaboard.

Duncan: I moved here four years ago. I knew nothing about the Adelaide food scene to be honest. I came here with Catherine, my wife. She was pregnant, and since we’d never had a child before, I thought I’d settle in a little bit, get a big money job. For a year I worked as the Executive Chef at the Adelaide Showground, which was actually really good – just learning big functions, the logistics of putting on a massive event. Then the Big Day Out came along and I got to cook for all my favourite bands that happened to be headlining, which was sick. You make the best of what you get I suppose, and once I’d done the [Royal Adelaide] Show and Big Day Out I’d done the biggest two events, it was time to get a real job. I went to Bistro Dom.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS

Duncan: When I moved here I thought, ‘I’m just going to eat at the best places in Adelaide’. Coming from the UK I didn’t think much of it. But I could see the ingredients were awesome. There’s an awesome wine culture, something that the UK lacks. I thought this is definitely a place I’d like to cook and show what I could do. There were some decent restaurants but there weren’t any ‘wow restaurants’, I suppose, without sounding like a dick.

Jock: Too late [laughs].

Duncan: What Lachie [Lachlan Colwill] was doing at The Manse was good.

Jock: That’s true, there was The Manse. What else was there? Vincenzo’s. Auge. Magill [Estate]. I ate at all of them when I arrived, probably the same as what you did. You arrive and see what’s around town.

Duncan: The Lane was another.

Jock: Chloe’s. Fino – high-end places but that was about it. Much like Duncan, I had some great meals but I wasn’t blown away. And the food that I do is different. I always questioned, ‘Why aren’t they using X,Y and Z? Even down to the local stuff and not making the best of it. Nobody was talking to each other – none of the chefs. I was like, ‘Wow, what’s going on here?’ It was odd. As a food scene, I found that a bit confusing. Back to what Duncan said, the produce and the people here were amazing. That was another reason for me to stay. Then I had a choice – do I go back to Sydney or do I stay here? I’ve got a child in each state and it would have been easy for me to go back to Sydney and open a restaurant.

DOING THEIR OWN THING

Duncan: When I was working under the previous owner [at Bistro Dom], we had to stick to the line of corporate canteen. When I took it on and started doing my own thing, it became a natural progression from that. We thought, ‘Fuck it, we’ll do what we do and try to cultivate an individual style within that area’. We weren’t really concerned at that point what anyone thought of us. We just did what we did. It wasn’t like, ‘Let’s explore a gap in the market’. Fine dining is hit and miss in terms of the trade, so we stripped it back, brought it back to basics.

Jock: I wasn’t thinking there’s a gap in the market that I could exploit at all. It was more trying to move to what I’ve always thought about, which is our current philosophy upstairs [Orana] and trying to get one step closer to that as the market would let me. We’ve always been the black sheep, when you say native ingredients they think witchetty grubs and worms and it’s not. Therefore it’s been an uphill battle and it would have been an uphill battle anywhere ... I think people are generally amazed that it’s not witchetty grubs or whatever, it is something refined and delicious. I’m very thankful we’re still in business today, and that’s because of the people of Adelaide at the end of the day.

DINING SCENE NOW

Duncan: People are throwing caution to the wind, cultivating their own style. One big thing we’ve been trying to fight against is that Melbourne/Sydney influence in our cooking. I think we have enough talent in this state to develop our own style.

Jock: I think in the last couple of years a lot of guys have grown up a bit and just thought, ‘We don’t need to follow a trend’. We’ve got all these great ingredients here. Great chefs like Duncan and Lachie [Colwill] have come through and said, ‘This is what I’m going to do’, and not given an arse about what anyone says about it. They’ve been fortunate enough to either have backers or someone who can assist them with that bold move because it is putting your balls on the table and saying, ‘Right, I’ve got this mad idea’. That takes a big set of balls and people with a wallet to achieve but once a couple of people do it, others look at it and go, ‘Yeah I can do it. I can follow my dream, I can do my own thing.’

Duncan: There was a massive hospitality brain-drain from Adelaide where the young hospos would go, ‘Fuck it. This place is crap. I’m going to Melbourne, Sydney’ and that’s where they’d stay. Now, they’re staying [here] and opening their own places.

LOCAL PLACES TO CHECK

Duncan: Clever Little Tailor is my favourite bar. Orana is an example of a restaurant in South Australia that is cultivating its own style and is what other restaurants interstate will emulate. Magill Estate, what Scott [Huggins] and Emma [McCaskill] are doing there, it’s a really good standard.

Jock: I enjoy Bistro Dom, and he’s [Duncan] opening a new restaurant later in the year, which is closer to his heart. Peel St restaurant; the whole Peel Street movement is fantastic and all those bars are super cool, nice places to go and hang out for a night because everything is close. Gouger Street’s Cork Wine Cafe. On Ebenezer, the guys have opened the Tasting Room behind us, which is fantastic. Great that we can send people there with a focus on wine as opposed to a bar. Restaurant-wise, love going to Hentley Farm, Lachie’s [Colwill] doing some amazing food there. It’s really cool – great food, and Lachie, in the time I’ve been here, he’s more than just found his feet, he’s cooking to his own style now; his food gets better year on year. Super nice to see that. Everyone goes to Ying Chow. When I bring people to town, nine times out of 10 we’ll end up at Ying Chow. I could name 100 restaurants we go to all the time. The thing is you could pick any of them and have a great night out. The service is so much better than it used to be, generally, around town.

ADELAIDEANS TAKING THE CITY FOR GRANTED

Jock: I think they do actually. They look at the glossy Harbour Bridge and Opera House and go, ‘Yeah we don’t have something iconic’. Well, we don’t have an iconic bridge or opera house, but quite frankly, if sitting in a car for hours every day is what comes with that, then surely we don’t want it. We’ve got amazing natural landscapes, which Sydney doesn’t have; that’s better than any harbour bridge you can put in front of me, I can tell you that right now.

Duncan: I think this is why we’re the most vocal [about Adelaide’s charms]; we don’t come from Adelaide. We see it with fresh eyes ... Having someone like James Spreadbury, an Adelaide boy, coming back from Copenhagen [NOMA’s Restaurant Manager] at the beginning of the year, he was blown away. In the next couple of years, you will be able to put this city against anywhere in the world and it will be a food destination.

Jock: I think everyone forgets that Adelaide gets labelled nationally as a big country town. What’s the population here?

Duncan: 1.2 million.

Jock: That’s about the same size as Copenhagen; it’s twice the size of Glasgow – that’s a fucking city. It’s not a big country town and it hasn’t been for quite some time. I think it’s a misconception by people who haven’t been here. When they do come down, chefs who have never been here before, and they eat at a few places, and drink at a few bars, they think, ‘Okay, it’s really cool here actually’. And then you start talking about the lifestyle, where you’re not siting in a car for two-and-a-half hours; 20 minutes to the hills, 10 minutes to the beaches, it’s much easier for us to conduct business in Adelaide than any other city. And it’s beautiful.


Jock Zonfrillo - The Nomad Chef

From the beginning of October, Jock Zonfrillo’s enticing show The Nomad Chef will appear on local screens after debuting across the globe on Pay TV and free-to-air channels. In each episode, the chef travels to a remote community to explore and learn their food and culture before returning to Orana to create a meal based on what he learnt.

“It was incredible to see, an incredibly humbling experience going to a lot of those places,” he explains. “To come back here and put a dinner on as an abstract expression of my snapshot, although brief, into a dinner for today’s diners was also interesting.

“It’s nice and natural. I hang around and learn from them for a couple of weeks, cook with them when I get the opportunity and then we have a bit of a party on the last day before I leave because inevitably they want to give you a nice send off. It’s a different food program to what’s currently around."

 

Duncan Welgemoed's New Restaurant

The Bistro Dom chef will leave his award-winning Waymouth Street restaurant to open a new bar and restaurant later this year on East Terrace. Welgemoed will collaborate with fellow Happy Motel member, designer James Brown (MASH), as well as Paul Glen and James Hillier (Golden Boy, Rocket Bar) on the yet-to-be named restaurant that will have a capacity for 80 diners and will be influenced by cuisine from South Africa and its surrounding areas, where Welgemoed is from.

“It’s basically going back to my heritage,” Welgemoed explains.

“We’re focusing on southern Africa for the first launch until we can start getting into it. What’s really interesting is that South Australia and southern Africa’s flora and fauna are quite similar. It’s easy for us to do and there are so many recipes. It’s what I cook at home. It’s so diverse and no one’s doing it, really. If you think of African food you’re thinking something really home-cooked but it’s so much more than that."

bistrodom.com.au
restaurantorana.com

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The Adelaide Review

Hill of Grace

Hill of Grace, the latest addition to Adelaide's dining scene, offers an exclusive view - the inside of Adelaide Oval. Chef Dennis Leslie gives The Adelaide Review the low-down prior to the restaurant's official launch.

As Adelaide Oval’s Executive Sous Chef, Leslie has spent the last year producing food for hundreds of functions and thousands of people at the Oval.

On match days the catering team stretches to serve a maximum of 55,000 people, including 3500 to 4000 people who are served plated meals in the corporate, events and Audi Stadium Club member areas, and 320 people who enjoy a buffet lunch in The John Halbert Room. Hill of Grace, in the Audi Stadium Club members’ area, seats just over 120 people.

When Dennis joined Adelaide Oval mid last year, the notion of opening a new fine dining restaurant at the Oval was still just that. However, the restaurant was originally intended for the exclusive use of Audi Stadium Club members on match days only.

“It was only this year, when the AFL season started, that [management] committed to having the restaurant open to the public five nights a week,” Leslie explains.

Things moved quickly after that and Hill of Grace launched at the end of August.

Located on the eastern side of the Oval, Hill of Grace takes its name from Henschke winery’s acclaimed Hill of Grace – the restaurant is now home to the world’s only complete set of Hill of Grace Shiraz. This priceless collection dates from 1958 to the current release.

“Henschke is an iconic winery in South Australia and the Henschkes loved the idea of [the partnership],” Leslie says.

“They love the cricket, too, so it was a good match.”

Local wine lovers will be happy to know that Hill of Grace serves only South Australian drops. While Henschke wines naturally take pride of place in the wine list, diners can choose from more than 160 wines by local wineries.

It’s this commitment to creating something special that will help determine Hill of Grace’s success as a regular dining venue – after all, an upmarket restaurant at Adelaide Oval was always going to do great business on match days. But Leslie and the team are banking on diners visiting on non-match days, too.

“I’d like to think that this restaurant is for [everyone], for all occasions,” he says.

“We did a lot of market research and we think we’ve got a good product.”

Leslie’s food is influenced by his love of Asian and native Australian ingredients, his Filipino heritage, his time as Executive Chef at Hilton Adelaide and, specifically, at The Brasserie with its Seriously South Australian menu, as well as his time in England where he worked in restaurants favouring classic French technique.

“People who have eaten here so far have commented on the different flavour profiles and combinations.”

Indeed, a quick glance at the menu reveals the enthusiastic use of interesting ingredients like calamansi, (Philippine lime) tamarind, kohlrabi (a type of turnip), quondongs (a native fruit), muntries (a native berry), kumquats and feijoa.

Working with Leslie in the Hill of Grace kitchen is a small but dedicated team.

“It was important to get the team right. You can’t pull off good food without having a good team,” he says. It’s clear that Leslie is happy in his new home. Moreover, the location of Hill of Grace has a special significance for him.

“I grew up watching cricket here when this was just an old tin shed. The restaurant is where I used to sit with my dad or whoever took me to the cricket. It was three or four levels down but this is literally the same spot.”

Hill of Grace
Dinner: Tuesdays to Saturdays. À la carte or eight-course degustation is $295 with matched Henschke wines or $175 without wine
Lunch: Fridays. Three-course is $85 or four-course $105

Audi Stadium Club, Adelaide Oval
8205 4777

adelaideoval.com.au
hungryaustralian.com
@HungryAustralia

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The Adelaide Review

Adelaide Central Market Week 2014

From Tuesday, September 2, to Saturday, September 6, celebrate Adelaide’s iconic Central Market with the second annual Market Week.

Last year’s inaugural event was a fabulous success, and the 2014 program has grown hugely from there. Cooking demonstrations and daily ‘happy hours’ (specials available at 10am and 3pm) mark a shift in Market Week thinking.

Enticing workshops on offer throughout the week include a fruit and veg foraging event, and a bacon-lovers’ class. There are more edible events in the timetable than we know what to do with: Barossa Fine Foods, matched with Head in the Clouds Wines; ‘Coffee Quaffing with the Coffee Bean’; and ‘Enchanting Mushrooms’ with Mushroom Man’s Mushroom Shop matched with 3 Dark Horses’ wines. The cooking classes with Lucia’s Fine Foods have reportedly sold out already.

If you’d prefer to experience the market at your own pace, there’s the Fine Food Forage: a self-guided tour that, for $30, gives you a list of places to try and products to collect at your leisure. This can be done between 9am and 4pm, Tuesday 2 to Friday 5 September, or from 9am – 1pm on Saturday 6 September.

The Market is also selling lunchboxes ($10 each) on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

Blue Lunchbox (vegetarian)
Beetroot, lentil and goat’s cheese salad – Lucia’s Fine Foods
Sheep’s milk honey yoghurt – Island Pure
Fruit and nut mix – House of Health
Pomegranate and walnut dip with crackers – Jagger Fine Foods
Pear – McMahons Fruit & Veg

Red Lunch Box
Mini ciabatta – Wild Loaf
Ham off the bone - Barossa Fine Foods
Aged gouda - The Smelly Cheese Shop
Fruit and nut bar – House of Health
Kalamata olives – Leo’s Cheese Bar
Scorched almonds – Charlesworth Nuts
Apple – Aubergine’s Fresh Produce

You can try your luck at getting tickets, goodie bags or lunchboxes on the day, but to be safe pre-purchase online by following the links in the Market Week program.

Events such as free opera, music and performing arts will be tabled alongside edible treats. The free Spring Market Party(Friday, September 5, 5pm – 8pm) will include wine tasting (AreteDe Anima and 3 Dark Horses), music from local bandGoldstein, roasted porchetta from Marino Meats and an oyster bar by Samtass Seafoods.

For full details, tickets and the timetable, visit the Adelaide Central Market website

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Coriole

A line-up of Reserve and Estate wines greets us at the Coriole cellar door.

The Vita Sangiovese has an aromatic punch of chocolate and fennel; and sharp flavours of dusty cherry, softened with age and a hint of licorice. The Dancing Fig is a Shiraz Mouvedre combination, a tribute to the fig trees planted across the estate. This ready-to-drink soft and youthful red excites the palate with tastes of blackberry and a hint of savoury herbs. Our wine guide, Velvet, is a charming and cheeky seductress, shocking us with bunny-hunting stories and entertaining the patrons tasting their way through the fruits of the Lloyd family’s labour.

We haven’t made a reservation, not realising that the Saturday lunch service gets so busy. It seems the word of Coriole’s new Head Chef Tom Reid has spread, and the atrium courtyard is full to the brim with people ready to tuck into a spread of foraged fare.

A table on the enclosed restaurant balcony serves as a more than suitable saviour. Without too much fuss, the table was set while we wandered the kitchen garden. Lush with all kinds of herbs, greens and edible garnishes, the once overgrown patch has since been lovingly tended by the estate gardeners and now kitchen apprentices spend their mornings gathering the freshest ingredients and trimmings for the dishes of the day.

Seated with some of the most spectacular views of the surrounding hills, lunch is a simple but gourmet affair. House-made sourdough – served with lashings of cultured Woodside Cheese Wrights butter, alongside Coriole olives and extra virgin olive oil –makes for a greedy start and we order more bread before main course even lands.

The follow-up platters du jour feature piles of pickled and roasted vegetables and salads, accompanied by all kinds of meats, cheeses and kitchen specialties. The salmon is prepared using more of the olive oil and scattered with capers and crunchy leaves from a locally grown succulent commonly known as ‘pigface’. From pigface to a pork-hock terrine; a meaty little dish that works perfectly atop a crisp lavosh, piled high with kohlrabi salad that has good tang and a mustard seed kick.

The pickled and roasted beet salad is a clear favourite, classically paired with fresh goat’s curd and presented like a little piece of artwork on the plate. A nettle salsa verde is smeared across slivers of beef carpaccio, and pickled heirloom carrots add colour, flavour and some necessary crunch. A central pile of cucumber ribbons scattered with pine nuts is perfectly acceptable, though perhaps unnecessary and nothing compared to its delicious neighbours; though I’m quickly distracted by a corner dedicated only to cheese, including a ripe Woodside Cheese Wrights Pompeii, a subtle jersey-cow Cheddar, and a soft and oozy Brie.

A wicked case of over-ordering comes next, with two dessert options artfully presented on some very sexy flatware. A thin slice of vanilla pannacotta snakes between crisp shards of delicate pastry; a sprinkling of fresh mint adds fragrance without overpowering; and a small pile of poached apple and perhaps pear is lightly spiced and adds balance to a dish of contrasting flavour. The last hurrah arrives in the form of a better-than-traditional chocolate fondant pudding, sitting on a mound of biscuit crunch. Edible flowers add a touch of colour and a quenelle of house made vanilla ice cream takes this dish to a place of sentimental pleasure.

The trail ends with another stroll around the grounds to stretch our weary legs and drink in the rolling views, along with a finishing glass. Spoils of the day are loaded away and with little but the feeling of sated comfort and tales of culinary adventure, we make our way home along meandering country roads.

Coriole
Chaffeys Road, McLaren Vale
Open Friday to Monday, 12pm to 4pm

coriole.com

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The Adelaide Review

Magill Estate named SA’s best restaurant

Penfolds Magill Estate was the big local winner in the Gourmet Traveller Restaurant Guide awards, as it was the only SA restaurant to hit the top 10 in the magazine’s annual Top 100 Restaurant Guide, while Magill Estate’s Scott Huggins and Emma McCaskill were named Best New Talent.

Melbourne’s Attica was named Australia’s Restaurant of the Year with Sydney’s Rockpool, Momofuko Seiobo and Quay and the regional Victorian newcomer Brae rounding out the top five. Penfolds Magill Estate just squeezed into the top 10 while Jock Zonfrillo’s Orana was listed as the country’s 16th best restaurant. Other SA eateries to make the top 100 are Appellation (47), Hentley Farm (67), Peel Street (85), Bistro Dom (96) and Fino (99).

Other major award winners include Sepia’s Martin Benn who took out Chef of the Year, while Birregurra’s Brae took out New Restaurant of the Year and Regional Restaurant of the Year.

2015 Gourmet Traveller Restaurant Guide: The Top 100

1. Attica, Vic
2. Rockpool, NSW
3. Momofuku Seiobo, NSW
4. Quay, NSW
5. Brae, Vic
6. Sepia, NSW
7. Cutler & Co, Vic
8. Marque, NSW
9. Vue de Monde, Vic
10. Penfolds Magill Estate, SA
11. Est, NSW
12. Rockpool Bar & Grill, NSW
13. Tetsuya's, NSW
14. Bentley, NSW
15. The Bridge Room, NSW
16. Orana, SA
17. Esquire, Qld
18. Garagistes, Tas
19. Rockpool Bar & Grill, Vic
20. Urbane, Qld
21. Provenance, Vic
22. Flower Drum, Vic
23. Sixpenny, NSW
24. Porteño, NSW
25. Sean's Panaroma, NSW
26. Four in Hand, NSW
27. Café Di Stasio, Vic
28. Lake House, Vic
29. Ten Minutes by Tractor, Vic
30. Ester, NSW
31. Grossi Florentino, Vic
32. The Press Club, Vic
33. Restaurant Amuse, WA
34. Aria, NSW
35. Print Hall, WA
36. Icebergs Dining Room & Bar, NSW
37. Pei Modern, Vic
38. Nu Nu, Qld
39. Mr Wong, NSW
40. Fish Face, NSW
41. Ormeggio, NSW
42. Pilu at Freshwater, NSW
43. Rockpool Bar & Grill, WA
44. Spice Temple, NSW
45. Wasabi, Qld
46. Aria Brisbane, Qld
47. Appellation, SA
48. Café Paci, NSW
49. Flying Fish, NSW
50. Woodland House, Vic
51. Oscillate Wildly, NSW
52. Rosetta, Vic
53. Buon Ricordo, NSW
54. Cumulus Inc, Vic
55. Gladioli, Vic
56. Spice Temple, Vic
57. Monopole, NSW
58. Moon Park, NSW
59. Otto Ristorante, NSW
60. Prix Fixe, Vic
61. Yoshii, NSW
62. The Apollo, NSW
63. Nomad, NSW
64. Luxembourg, Vic
65. Vasse Felix, WA
66. Tonka, Vic
67. Hentley Farm, SA
68. Ezard, Vic
69. Bistrode CBD, NSW
70. The Terrace Restaurant, Vic
71. Cho Cho San, NSW
72. The Town Mouse, Vic
73. The Argus Dining Room, Vic
74. Bodega, NSW
75. Jim McDougall in Stefano's Cellar, Vic
76. Moon Under Water, Vic
77. The Fish House, Qld
78. Bar Lourinhã, Vic
79. 10 William St, NSW
80. MoVida Aqui, Vic
81. Longrain, NSW
82. MoVida, Vic
83. MoVida Sydney, NSW
84. Valentino, Vic
85. Peel Street, SA
86. Albert St Food & Wine, Vic
87. Billy Kwong, NSW
88. Gerard's Bistro, Qld
89. Gastro Park, NSW
90. Yellow, NSW
91. Felix, NSW
92. Saint Crispin, Vic
93. The Atlantic, Vic
94. Aubergine, ACT
95. Monster, ACT
96. Bistro Dom, SA
97. Co-op Dining, WA
98. Subo, NSW
99. Fino, SA
100. Stokehouse Brisbane, Qld

Magill Estate photos: Jacqui Way

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The Adelaide Review

Welgemoed to open new restaurant

There will be another exciting addition to Adelaide’s flourishing food and wine scene, as Bistro Dom’s Duncan Welgemoed is leaving his award-winning Waymouth Street restaurant to open a bar and restaurant in November.

The Bistro Dom chef will collaborate with fellow Happy Motel member, designer James Brown (MASH), as well as Paul Glen and James Hillier (Golden Boy, Rocket Bar) on the new restaurant and bar, which will open in November. The yet-to-be named restaurant will be located in the east of the city, have a capacity for 80 diners and will be influenced by cuisine from South Africa and its surrounding areas, where Welgemoed is from.

“It’s basically going back to my heritage,” Welgemoed, who curated the successful Lola’s Pergola degustation series First Fruit as part of the Adelaide Festival earlier this year, told The Adelaide Review.

“We’re focussing on southern Africa for the first launch until we can start getting into it. What’s really interesting is that South Australia and southern Africa’s flora and fauna are quite similar. It’s easy for us to do and there are so many recipes. It’s what I cook at home. It’s so diverse and no-one’s doing it, really. If you think of African food you’re thinking something really home-cooked but it’s so much more than that.”

Welgemoed says he wants to cook African-inspired food that’s “accessible, contemporary and fun”. The new place will cater for people who want to drop past for a snack or stay longer for a complete dining experience.

More information will be released in early September. Doors will open in spring.

Picture: Duncan Welgemoed and James Brown

Photographer: John Laurie

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The Adelaide Review

Dark Mofos

Bistro Dom’s Duncan Welgemoed and two Sydney chefs, Jared Ingersoll and Alex Herbert, were in Hobart recently for the Dark Mofo Winter Feast – another brainchild of David Walsh. The three chefs travelled to Tassie to cook for the masses. Here are their stories.

Duncan Welgemoed (Bistro Dom, The Happy Motel)

Take one-part fire, two parts debauchery, a fistful of winter produce and a sprinkling of dark arts, spin it in on high inside a Ferris wheel of death and cook gently in front of a flaming bookshelf. That's pretty much how we spent our Dark Mofo weekend. The event showcased what's good about the winter solstice: feasting, the promise of nudity, dancing, whiskey (I know it has nothing to do with the solstice) and a community getting close around a fire.

Still a tourist in this country, I noticed that Tasmanians are friendlier versions of mainland Aussies. Even the usual Saturday night wino helped me find my way to a whiskey bar and made sure he vomited far enough away from me as to avoid me smelling the sick. Good man.

The biggest eye opener, however, was the fact that Tasmania’s art, food, and booze scene is cementing a new identity within Australia, kind of like South Australia but colder. David Walsh is an obvious driving force and the passion he has is incredibly infectious. How does one man pretty much gain the hearts and minds of an entire state? The answer, some might say, is a mixture of money, honesty, lateral thinking and a penchant for doing what he wants. I applaud anyone who gives the middle finger to the establishment, has a glass of wine and programs the shit out of a festival to make it one of the most talked about events of the year. In South Australia, we should be more concerned about the overall experience instead of the bureaucracy attached.

Cooking with three of my friends, in an environment solely built on creating a feast for the senses, was something we can all take away. It's not about corporate sponsorship, it's not about the bottom line, it's about the community having a cracking time.

@GastroPunkOz

Jared Ingersoll (Food for People)

When I was 11, I followed my mum to work and I stepped into my first commercial kitchen, an army mess in Trentham, New Zealand. It was huge. Everything in that space was loud, hot and noisy with massive knives and fire everywhere. It blew me away. From that day, all I wanted to do was be in a kitchen.

The next most important moment in my life was cooking for the first time. I found a recipe for a dish called beggar’s chicken, a Chinese dish that required a chicken to be cooked in a salt crust with soy and spices. My family thought I was mental, I didn’t care. The recipe looked complicated but it gave me a sense of purpose that comforted me. Hours later, the final result was a hard clay that, when cracked, allowed the most delicious aroma to fill the house; everyone was instantly happy and hungry. The satisfied looks on their faces when they ate the soft, sweet and salty chicken filled my heart with joy. I was 12, awkward, lonely and living in a council estate with not much to my name but now I had a purpose – to satisfy others with my cooking. 

That feeling has never left me.

My career has been full and rewarding, it has delivered me much pleasure and bucket loads of heartache and stress. In the beginning it was about the kitchen and learning skills and techniques, but as I developed I realised that I was but a small part of the equation and that led me to my fascination and love of the ingredients, the farmers, the seasons and the environment. 

When asked to be a part of Dark Mofo, I dropped everything to do it. I was overjoyed when the final line-up was announced – Duncan, Alex and myself. Three unique chefs who see food differently but share a love of nature, food and satisfying the customer. Three brave cooks, who are not intimidated by flame and smoke, rather thrive in the face of something as deliciously enormous as cooking at Dark Mofo. Three citizens who embrace hedonistic pursuits with grounded humility! Thirty years after that beggar’s chicken I felt I had a purpose – to satisfy others with my cooking. 

@JaredIngersoll

Alex Herbert (ex-Bird Cow Fish)

I have known Jared Ingersoll for many years but before this year had only collaborated on a cooking gig twice before, both back in 2009. Jared was one of the chefs I cajoled into participating in the SIFF BBQ to cook alongside Fergus Henderson. The other was a collaborative dinner for Carlo Petrini from Slow Food at my then restaurant, Bird Cow Fish, in Surry Hills.

I first came across Duncan on Twitter. He caught my attention with his bravado. Since then, we have increasingly crossed paths on a personal and professional level. Our food styles are different but we share a love of great produce and having a good time while we play with it. Earlier this year we came together for the first time. Jared and I cooked a dinner together at the Adelaide Festival’s Lola’s Pergola. Needless to say, we all got along quite famously. 

When the invitation to cook at Dark Mofo popped up in my inbox, it was a no brainer. We were asked to each cook a dish of our choice over three nights for the Winter Feast, as part of the Winter Solstice celebrations. We were just three of many chefs, cooks and producers who embraced the bounty of Tasmania’s produce and reveled in feeding the many people who wanted to come together to play, listen talk, sing and dance. 

There are festivals and then there are festivals. Winter Feast at Dark Mofo is one of those that truly lived up to and beyond its expectation on every level. It was a celebration of all the senses: acoustic, aromatic, visual and emotionally uplifting. It was the essence of how I came to love sharing and cooking food with other people.

@birdcowfish

darkmofo.net.au

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Larry & Ladd

The newest kid on the block is the only child of coffee-god parents Bar 9 and Coffee Branch.

Larry & Ladd opened quietly earlier this week, but already the queues are 10 people deep and curious onlookers are crowding the glass walls in Regent Arcade.

The café is cosily dark, with very on-trend black-painted ceiling, polished concrete floor and exposed brick wall behind the counter. Setting Larry & Lad apart from the rest is the British racing green speed stripe across the back feature wall, which also hosts a display of art and culture magazines for purchase. Flowers – from fellow Regent Arcaders Boo & Who? – decorate the store, adding a sweet lushness to the industrial edge.

larry and lad adelaide regent arcade new cafe 2014

Jeremy Downey, part-owner and enthusiastic barista extraordinaire, is already greeting customers by name on the third day of business, ensuring – no doubt – regulars for life. Between the coffee machine and the two large, granite-top tables inside, Downey encourages peekers to come inside and not be shy.

It works.

Despite there being around 20 customers in the 28-seat café (including another long table in the arcade), queues aren’t long and service is quick. The snacks – pastries and interesting sandwiches – are on display on the front counter so you can see precisely what it is you’re getting into. Vegetarians are well looked after, with mushroom, tomato or cheese choices across the range.

Two of the sandwich options recommended by Larry & Ladd staff are the soused herring, and the potato tortilla and chorizo.

larry and lad adelaide regent arcade new cafe 2014 chorizo potato tortilla soused herring

A potato and sausage sandwich might not sound particularly trustworthy, but it is ridiculously tasty – cold, flavourful potato melt around the warm and spicy chorizo, both mellowed with honey and labne.

The herring – with boiled egg and orange aioli – is a little wet, but the Nordic flavours work neatly together.

The snack options, including a range of toasties, are well-priced, ranging from $4.50 to $6.50. Coffee – a unique blend from Five Senses roasters – is equally modestly priced, competing well with other city cafes.

Welcoming, delicious and fast – what more could you hope for from the Lads?

larry and lad adelaide regent arcade new cafe 2014

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The Adelaide Review

Orana named South Australia’s best restaurant

Jock Zonfrillo’s Orana continues to impress, as the Rundle Street establishment was named South Australia’s Best Restaurant at the Restaurant and Catering SA Awards for Excellence at the Entertainment Centre last night. 

The win follows Orana’s three nominations in the national Gourmet Traveller Awards, which includes New Restaurant of the Year, Sommelier of the Year and Wine List of the Year for the magazine’s annual awards that will be announced later this month. Orana, with its native Australian-inspired fine cuisine, also took home the Best Fine Dining gong at last night’s Restaurant and Catering Awards. Other major winners include the National Wine Centre, which won Caterer of the Year while the Wine Centre’s Head Chef Philip Pope was named Best Chef.  

Golden Boy was named Best New Restaurant while the Botanic Garden Restaurant took home two gongs: Best Contemporary Australian (Metropolitan) and Best Wedding Caterer. The Lifetime Achiever Award went to Appellation’s Jim Carreker while Magill Estate’s Martin O’Connor won Best Maitre d’ and Press* Food and Wine’s David Currie was named Sommelier of the Year. The winners are below.

rcsa.asn.au

Restaurant and Catering SA Awards for Excellence 2014 Winners

Best Restaurant: Orana

Lifetime Achiever: Jim Carreker (Appellation at the Louise)

Best Chef: Philip Pope (National Wine Centre)

Best Fine Dining: Orana 

Best New Restaurant: Golden Boy

Popular Choice: Peel Street 

Best Restaurant in a Winery: Hentley Farm 

Best Maitre d’: Martin O’Connor (Magill Estate)

Caterer of the Year: National Wine Centre

Best Wedding Caterer: Botanic Garden Restaurant

Best Vietnamese Restaurant: My Tho City

Best Venue Caterer: Epicure at the State Library

Best Thai: Toptai

Best Sushi: Sushi Train (Central Market)

Best Steak (Informal): Carmel’s Cafe Bar and Grill

Best Steak (Formal): Mayura Station’s The Tasting Room 

Best Small Caterer: Mediterranean

Best Small Bar: The Tasting Room

Best Site Contract Caterer: Medirest at Eldercare Allambi 

Best Seafood: Cardone’s Seafood and Grill

Best Restaurant in a Pub/Club: The HWY

Best Restaurant in a Hotel: The Treasury

Best Mexican: Viva Zapata

Best Japanese: Shiki 

Best Italian Formal: Chianti

Best Italian Informal: Ambrosini’s

Best Industrial Institutional Caterer: Medirest at Eldercare Allambi

 Best Greek Restaurant: Zucca Greek Mezze

Best Function Centre: National Wine Centre

Best Family Restaurant: Cucina Nuova

Best Event Caterer: Adelaide Oval 

Best European: Georges on Waymouth

Best Contemporary Australian (Regional): Appellation at the Louise

Best Contemporary Australian (Metropolitan): Botanic Garden Restaurant

Best Coffee Shop: Cibo Espresso (O’Connell St) 

Best Chinese Restaurant: House of Chow

Best Cafe: Assaggio

Best Breakfast: Chianti

Best Bakery/Patisserie: Muratti Cakes & Gateaux

Best Asian: Hanuman

Best Wine List: Barn Steakhouse

Sommelier of the Year: David Currie (Press* Food and Wine)

Media Winnes: David Washington (InDaily)

Safety Award: Adelaide Casino

Best service Provider: Abeo Design 

Apprentice Cook of the Year: Brionie Pearson (Lenzerheide)

Best Employee: Poonam Desai (British India)

Best Employer: The Strand Cafe

Best Product Supplier: Treasury Wine Estate

Hall of Fame (Best Steak): Barn Steakhouse

Hall of Fame (Site Contract Caterer): Eurest at Hewlett Packard

Hall of Fame (Restaurant in a Hotel): Playford Adelaide

Hall of Fame (Coffee Shop/Tea House): Argo on The Parade

Jock Zonfillo picutre: Matt Turner

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The Adelaide Review

The Secret Blend

Taylor Blend may seem small when you walk in, but the passion and enthusiasm of the staff is huge. I even noticed it radiating though to the smiling customers walking in at the same time as me. The décor consisted of woodgrain and browns with eye-catching artwork that really stands out when you enter. Brewing methods on offer other than espresso include the pour-over, but the chilli-infused cold drip is definitely of note.

Taylor Blend offers plenty of single origins and blends depending on what’s in season or what rare and exotic beans they can get their hands on. They have the freedom to use different roasters from around Australia, so, as you can imagine, choosing what to try for my espresso was hard. I went with a single origin from Costa Rica called La Pena Tarrazu and it was divine. The first sip had a sharp acidity that amazed me when it turned into roasted nuts and savoury biscuits. It also had a natural sweetness in the aftertaste, resulting in a memorable experience.

The latte was made from a secret blend, which is always on offer, called ‘The Taylor House Blend’, locally roasted by Simply Coffee. It was made with Tweedvale milk and served with a rosetta as the latte art. The first sip of the latte had a strong almond taste, followed by a creamy caramel aftertaste.

The next time you have a day off, I recommend taking a drive up the hill to Taylor Blend, not just for the amazing coffee, but for a beautiful scenic walk through Ferguson Park next door. You may even come across a koala to share your coffee with.

Taylor Blend
1/34 Hallett Road, Stonyfell

taylorblend.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Food For Thought: Foie Gras

I want my chickens roaming free in paddocks of green pasture and eating nothing but grass and the occasional worm – I don’t purchase or eat eggs that come from anything less, but my position on the production of foie gras is far less passionate and, to be honest, I have somewhat double standards on the issue.

Geese have been ‘force-fed’ for more than 5000 years and, in fact, it was the Egyptians that are said to have noticed how migrating geese would naturally plump up for the long trip ahead of them. It wasn’t long until the Romans noticed how geese could overeat and that their lack of a gag reflex allowed them to consume copious amounts of figs and, in turn, enlarge their liver and provide a prized delicacy of the era.

The fall of Rome would almost see the practice of foie gras disappear and it is said that if it wasn’t for the Jews taking the technique around Europe it may have been lost in history forever. The very rich livers provided Jews with kosher fat to cook with, while olive oil and dairy fat were scarce. Adopted and loved by France, the technique was, and will possibly always be, synonymous with French gastronomy.

With the production and consumption of foie gras now steep in French history, the rise of pâté, terrines and parfaits was seen all throughout the 17th century.

This ingenious method of preserving meat by the addition of animal or dairy fat is making somewhat of a comeback and artisan producers are popping up all over the country. Chicken liver parfait that has been perfectly protected with a seal of clarified butter, served with crunchy sourdough and a cornichon for some wanted acidity, is something not to be refused.

I admit the technique in which foie gras is produced is not the most ethical, and for that reason banned in Australia and many parts of the world, but it is an important part of food history that deserves to be recognised for its mark on history and, let’s face it, its delicious contribution to gastronomy and its means for preserving food through less opulent times.

Walnut and Muscatel Bread Recipe
Makes 3 loaves

Ingredients

• 500g plain flour (organic if possible)
• 7g dried yeast
• 300ml warm water
• 1 tsp salt
• 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil
• 2 tbs sugar
• 1.5 tbs spice mix
• 150g dried muscatels
• 100g walnuts
• 300ml warm water
• Spice mix
• 50g cinnamon
• 50g allspice
• 25g cloves
• 25g ground ginger
• 12g nutmeg
• 3 tbs cardamom

Method

1. Activate the yeast in the warm water for five minutes.
2. Combine the our, salt, oil and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer.
3. Mix brie y with the dough hook on a low speed to combine the dry ingredients.
4. Slowly add the yeast and water.
5. Increase the speed to medium and leave for 15 minutes or until the dough will stretch and allows you to see through it.
6. Add the walnuts and muscatels. Mix until combined.
7. Place in an oiled bowl, leave to prove for 45 minutes or until doubled in size.
8. Divide the dough into three even pieces and form into a baguette shape.
9. Place on a floured baking tray and leave to prove for a further 30 minutes.
10. Bake in the oven for 30 to 45 minutes. Bread is ready when if tapped on the bottom, the echoing sound is hollow.
11. Leave to cool.
12. Slice thinly and toast in the oven for a crisp finish.


Pork and Pistachio Terrine Recipe

Ingredients

• 1.8kg pork
• 200g back fat
• 10g fennel seeds
• 1 white onion
• 1 tsp thyme leaves
• 1 egg
• 1/2 cup whole pistachio
• Salt and white pepper
• Sliced pancetta or thinly sliced bacon

Method

1. Ask your butcher to mince the pork and back fat on a 8mm blade.
2. In a generous glug of olive oil, sweat the onions, thyme and fennel seeds until translucent and soft. Leave to cool.
3. Combine the pork mince, back fat, cooled onions and the egg, mix until it becomes sticky and forms a ball (slapping the mixture on the side of the bowl will help it combine).
4. Add a large pinch of salt and pepper along with the pistachio nuts and mix until evenly dispersed throughout. (Frying a small amount of the mixture to check the seasoning at this stage will help you get a perfect end result).
5. Line a terrine mould with greaseproof paper.
6. Line the tin with sliced pancetta, length ways and with a slight overlap.
7. Pack the mix in to the mould making sure you pat the tin frequently to remove any air pockets.
8. Cover the top of the terrine with the remaining pancetta slices.
9. Tightly cover the top of the terrine with greaseproof paper and a layer of aluminum foil.
10. Fill a large baking tray with boiling water in an oven preheated to 160 degrees.
11. Place the terrine in the water bath.
12. Bake for an hour and then remove the cover, continue to bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until 72 degrees in the centre.
13. Leave to rest and cool to room temperature before placing two tins of tomatoes on top to lightly press in the refrigerator overnight.
14. Serve at room temperature with slices of crusty bread.

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Golden Boy

It seems every time a high-profile chef departs one restaurant for another, stories of strained relationships and poorly-plated politics are rife. Just months after opening to local applaud, the Golden Boy-loving public was ‘rocked’ at the news that Chef Nu Suandokmai had quit. The headlines were dramatic and the industry unsettled, according to local reports, but who knows what really goes on below deck?

As betrayed as they might have felt, kitchen crews behind these restaurant rifts stand united, keep on cooking and maintain the same standards. Even if the Captain had jumped ship (or was forced to walk the plank), there’s almost always a First Mate to step in and steer the new vessel.

Enter new Captain Miles Davies – formerly of Jolleys Boathouse, as incidental pirate-puns would have it.

Recently based in Sydney developing a dedicated taste for South East Asian food under the eye of revered chef Christine Mansfield at former fine dining restaurant Universal, Davies has returned home to take the mantle as the new (and perhaps improved?) Golden Boy of Adelaide’s Asian-fusion cuisine.

I had eaten at Golden Boy a few times before and it was always a great experience, but let’s not dwell on the past; instead let’s concentrate on the delicious and the charming.

Golden Boy’s interior is delightful. I think back to the days when this was the Botanic Bar’s dark and dated Chesterfield-clad cigar lounge and thank the designers for this resurrection. Clean, bright and comical, with etchings and prints traversing white walls and a white marble bench running right down the centre of the compact but well-utilised space. The bright and white extends through to the kitchen with a row of golden light fittings suspended from black metal poles – a striking feature against the rest of the clean interior.

The food is delicious. Betel leaves are stuffed full of seafood flavours that change regularly. I’m a fan of the salmon but the crab is even better, as the silky, creamy paste filling and chilli hit excites and leaves you wanting more – drizzle it with supplied lime wedges if you love a bit of tang, it’s worth it for balance and takes the chilli edge off, too. In the salmon vs kingfish sashimi battle, the salmon proves almighty – a dainty little fish dish with perfect lime-y acidity supported by galangal, soy and palm sugar to balance the mix. Keeping with the seafood tradition, a beady-eyed barramundi is battered, herbed, fried and placed decadently atop a pile of leaves, spices and herbs.

Out of the ocean and onto the land, a flavour-infused Jungle Curry dish features stir-fried sirloin, kangkung, holy basil and banana chilli that almost pushes you over the spicy edge. The TBBC is a simple combo of edamame beans, chilli and bean curd and is a play on the locally-adopted Gouger Street favourite with a touch of Thai. Spice-rubbed pork spare ribs are slow roasted for hours and served with a roast garlic dipping sauce. These are lip-smackingly delicious and a good break from the chilli heat of the rest of the menu. The Massaman curry is the only slight let-down. Although tasty, the Wagyu beef was not as tender as expected and while I do enjoy the flavour of star anise,  mistaking a pod for a curry-soaked morsel of meat left a fairly strong taste between my teeth. Fortunately the duck curry made up for it. Roasted legs swam in a lovely fragrant yellow curry, sweetened with pineapple and Thai basil. It’s one of those dishes you can never go past on a menu, and in this case you certainly shouldn’t.

For those of you with ambition (or those on the hunt for that perfectly Instagram-able bird’s eye shot) make sure you order the plate of chilli accompaniments.

The staff is charming. Whether it was the time seated at the chef’s bench overlooking the kitchen or the main dining space, the service makes the experience. Attentive, professional and just a little bit cheeky, these guys and girls know their business, their food and their customers.

Golden Boy hasn’t changed too much since opening its doors, but where it has, it’s for the better. It is testament to the idea that there’s more to navigating a ship than who is at the helm. Boatswains and deck hands all have their place to ensure smooth sailing, especially through turbulent waters.

goldenboyrestaurant.com

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The Adelaide Review

Adelaide venues up for Gourmet Traveller Awards

Leading the way is Jock Zonfrillo’s new venture Orana, with nominations in the New Restaurant Of The Year, Wine List Of The Year and Sommelier Of The Year categories.

The fresh-faced team of Scott Huggins and Emma McCaskill, who took over as head chefs at Penfolds Magill Estate last year, has been nominated for Best New Talent, while South Australia’s small bar legislation is partly to thank for our final nomination in the Bar Of The Year category, going to Clever Little Tailor.

You can find the full list of nominees below. The winners will be announced on Wednesday August 20 at the launch of the 2015 Australian Restaurant Guide.

The five South Australian nominations are an outstanding achievement in the largely east coast-dominated awards and mark a turning point for Adelaide’s hospitality industry. In previous years South Australian venues have fared poorly at the Australian Gourmet Traveller Restaurant Awards, scoring two nominations in 2012 and only one in 2013.

Finalists: 2014 Australian Gourmet Traveller Restaurant Awards

Best New Talent
Mat Lindsay, Ester, Sydney, NSW
Victor Liong, Lee Ho Fook, Melbourne, Vic
Alex Drobysz, Bar Nacional, Melbourne, Vic
Eun Hee An & Ben Sears, Moon Park, Sydney, NSW
Mike Eggert & Jemma Whiteman, Pinbone, Sydney, NSW
Scott Huggins & Emma Jade Mccaskill, Penfolds Magill Estate, Adelaide, SA

New Restaurant Of The Year
Brae, Birregurra, Vic
Ester, Sydney, NSW 
Orana, Adelaide, SA 

Wine List Of The Year
Moon Park, Sydney, NSW
Print Hall, Perth, WA
Orana, Adelaide, SA

Sommelier Of The Year
Nick Hildebrandt, Bentley, Sydney, NSW
Marc Esteve Mateu, The Press Club, Melbourne, Vic
Josh Picken, Orana, Adelaide, SA

Maître d’ Of The Year
Simon Freeman, Brae, Birregurra, Vic
Christian McCabe, The Town Mouse, Melbourne, Vic 
Romeo Lee, Sixpenny, Sydney, NSW

Regional Restaurant Of The Year
Brae, Birregurra, Vic
Provenance, Beechworth, Vic
Nu Nu, Palm Cove, Qld

Bar Of The Year
Bar Americano, Melbourne, Vic
Lefty’s Old Time Music Hall, Brisbane, Qld 
Clever Little Tailor, Adelaide, SA

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The Adelaide Review

Measuring Creativity with Ferran Adrià

It was in the late 1980s that Ferran Adrià, on a visit to Nice, heard Jacques Maximin define creativity as “creativity means not copying”. Since then, nothing’s been the same.

Adrià’s elBulli kitchen closed for winter for the first time to focus on development of new techniques and dishes following that visit to the Maximin’s restaurant at the Negresco Hotel. It was a long time ago – but it’s an important turning point. Perhaps this is where Adrià’s trajectory to become the best chef in the world began?

Adrià had always been a remarkable chef. Having joined elBulli in Spain in 1984, he travelled overseas to meet other chefs and gain inspiration. In 1996, Joel Robuchon described him as the best chef in the world – perhaps the first international endorsement of his talents, but certainly not the last. Heston Blumenthal, Juan Mari Arzak, and Paul Bocuse are just a few of the chefs who reiterate admiration for Adrià’s genius.

He was travelling the world promoting elBulli 2005-2011 when The Adelaide Review met him. elBulli 2005-2011 is a seven-volume compendium with striking imagery, luxurious paper stock and meticulously gathered insights into the 1846 dishes created over seven years at elBulli.

Adrià has taken creativity further than just not copying. He is convinced creativity can be measured. “Yes, perfectly so,” he states.

“But in general, we don’t want to do it because it seems as if, ‘Okay, if I’m creative then I can do anything! Don’t pressure me, because pressure is not good for me if I am creative.’ That is not true. You can measure creativity at the end — whether you have produced or not. There are so very many ways to create in the world and so many disciplines in the world that everyone has their own process. But it’s the quantity of results, that’s where you are going to measure it, so you can measure it perfectly.”


Ferran Adria portrait.

The measurement of creativity, even with a reliable formula, isn’t an easy process. It’s hard to imagine what would motivate someone to do it.

“To not copy myself. Most people don’t want to look at their own past because they would realise that they copy themselves,” he says.

“Another thing that’s important is, if you understand what you do and analyse it, I think it’s useful for you to create, at least it’s useful for me to create. When you want to last for many years — I want to be very long-lasting in creativity — it is a daily battle. And all of this self-supervision, if you will, I think it’s very important to do it. And this is just subjective, some people may say, ‘Oh no, that’s not true’, but then I’d like to see how long they last. And in general you could say that people who have lasted [for] a long time have been very ordered.”

The compendium, elBulli 2005–2011, certainly reflects this order. Each dish is beautifully photographed and recorded. Ironically perhaps, it will lead to copying.

“Well, if we publish something like this, it is indeed to share it,” he says.

“Some people take 10 ideas, others take five. Another takes one. For someone it’s a life changing experience, for someone else it’s not. Every chef is different but it is without a doubt a very influential work.”

It is also a very beautiful work, by any aesthetic measure, and was mostly completed in-house, including the photography.

“We do this every year, four or five times a year. And the styling, we also did that. Because after 1846 dishes and thousands and thousands of snapshots we have learnt a thing or two.”

elBulli 2005–2011 is available through Phaidon Australia

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The Adelaide Review

Food For Thought: Afternoon Tea

The very hungry Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, is rumoured to have started the late afternoon indulgence of cake and tea in the early 1840s. The lull of energy and the hunger pains that creep up on us all became too much for Anna and she began to take a cup of tea, bread and butter, and a small cake in her room. With hunger kept at bay, the only thing lacking was company, so she began to share her afternoon ritual with others.

By the 1880s the art of taking afternoon tea had turned into a grand affair for all concerned. Etiquette on how to dress, set the table and even the invention of fine bone china came from the growing demands of the upper-class and their afternoon tea sessions.

Once guests were at the table, and suitably dressed for the occasion, the most iconic afternoon tea dish would grace the table: the very humble cucumber sandwich. It was the humbleness of this sandwich that proved just how much of an extravagant event afternoon tea was. While a nation was starving, and every meal was considered to be of importance, the upperclass were enjoying frivolous sandwiches that had little to no nutritional benefit. The cucumber sandwich would make legendary status and was even referenced in the first act of The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.

Once sandwiches had been eaten, only then would a selection of small, but very elegant, cakes be brought to the table. Victorian classics – fruit cake, sponge cake and brandy snap baskets – kept people eating well into the evening. But foreign influences would eventually make their way to the table and are now considered mandatory inclusions at afternoon tea.

Madeleines, traditionally baked in the shape of scallop shells, are the perfect addition to the afternoon tea line-up. Originally from the northeast of France, these cakes have the perfect crumb for soaking up hot cups of tea.

Although many of us reference high tea, it was in fact afternoon tea that was the more grand and lavish affair. High tea was traditionally a more robust event and enjoyed in a much more relaxed way. High tea was also served much later in the day but more importantly was the meal directly after finishing a long day’s work. It is suggested that this is where the term ‘tea time’ originated.

Whether it is afternoon tea, high tea or even a snack and a cup of tea, most of us indulge in this ritual daily, thanks to Anna and her hunger pains!

Madeleines Recipe

This cake batter is traditionally baked in shell-moulded tins but if you don’t have one, they bake perfectly in muffin tins.

Ingredients

• 4 eggs
• 150g caster sugar
• 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
• Zest of two oranges
• 150g unsalted butter
• Extra butter for greasing the tins
• 200g plain flur
• Pinch of salt
• 1 teaspoon bicarbonate soda

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 210 degrees. 2. Whisk the eggs and sugar for four to five minutes or until pale and double in volume.
3. Add the orange zest and vanilla. Whisk for a further minute to combine.
4. Melt the butter until slightly nut brown; set aside to cool.
5. Using a pastry brush, lightly grease the tins with room temperature butter (if not using a non-stick pan, lightly dust the buttered tin with flour. Tap upside down to remove any excess flour and leave to set in the fridge for 15 minutes).
6. Sift the flour, bicarb soda and pinch of salt onto the egg mixture.
7. Lightly fold the mixture.
8. Add the melted butter when nearly all of the flour has been incorporated, ensuring to fold the mixture gently to ensure a light batter.
9. Spoon the mixture into the moulds, filling them around three quarters of the way to the top.
10. Bake for 10 minutes or until just set in the centre and golden on the underside.
11. Serve warm from the oven.

@annabelleats

 

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The Adelaide Review

Java Lifestyle: Great wall of Coffee

As soon as you walk into Java Lifestyle you are greeted by friendly staff, a five kilogram coffee roaster and a wall of coffee beans sourced from around the world.

I was drawn in like a magnet and didn’t hesitate to ask about the 1950s vintage Gaggia espresso machine that’s set up on display like the true piece of art that it is. The great wall of coffee beans consisted of 20 bean hoppers with well displayed names and shiny fittings that reminded me of lolly dispensers from my childhood.

The barista was very busy but still able to talk to me about the beans on offer. For my espresso she suggested I try a single origin bean called Ethiopian Sidamo. Full of flavour, it had a big impact upon my first sip, the cherry notes initially dominated but the cocoa came through towards the end.

For the latte, I tried their house blend called Super Crema; made from beans from Colombia, Africa, India and Sumatra. The first sip had hints of roasted nuts but then the dark chocolate notes came through. It was presented with the latte art of a rosetta and made with milk from Tweedvale.

Java Lifestyle is a place that has a very bright clean feel to it with that hint of traditional coffee house mixed in. There’s a great display of some antique equipment and, if you’re lucky, you might even catch them roasting the beans that you’ll be enjoying in your next cup.

Java Lifestyle
2/84 Gorge Rd, Newton

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The Adelaide Review

Maggie’s Mission

Renowned cook and food personality Maggie Beer has established The Maggie Beer Foundation, which aims to improve the quality of food being served to elderly Australians.

Launched in April 2014 at Tasting Australia (part of which included a forum on the elderly and a cooking competition for chefs from aged-care centres), Beer’s mission is to marry her innate knowledge of what good food can do for everyone’s (particularly the elderly’s) state of mind to the latest cutting-edge research on nutrition’s impact on brain health and general well-being.

Beer describes the initiative as a “truly nourishing mix, so much greater than the sum of its parts”.

A good food life for all, and all that encompasses, is what drives Beer, and that includes the aged. Beer’s interest in the elderly was sparked when, as Senior Australian of the Year in 2010, she spoke at a conference of aged-care leaders.

Drawing inspiration from her “mentor”, the indefatigable Stephanie Alexander, Beer wants to do for elderly South Australian aged care residents what Stephanie’s Kitchen Garden Foundation does in enhancing food education in primary schools.

“Everyone, regardless of their age or circumstance, deserves access to good food,” Beer says.

She is aware of the enormity and complexity of the task ahead to create change in a positive, inclusive way. “That’s why I created my Foundation comprised of a skilled Board with expertise and a message designed to appeal to like-minded people around Australia.”

Beer has teamed up with Country Health SA in leading a campaign to improve the food served in regional aged-care facilities in SA. The project will be trialed initially at Mount Pleasant Hospital and Abbeyfield Residential Care in Williamstown as part of the State Government’s Ageing Action Plan.

The regional project will involve Beer developing and testing a new approach to food in aged care, with a focus on quality, freshness and presentation. According to well-known chef Simon Bryant, some of the major hurdles facing aged-care homes were budgets, training and liability surrounding risks such as falls, food poisoning and choking.

Currently more than 15,000 people are in residential care homes, while about 70,000 people use home and community care services in South Australia. As South Australia’s population ages, these numbers are set to increase rapidly. In 2011, the state had nearly 400,000 Baby Boomers (born 1946-64), which represented nearly 25 percent of the population.

The project will focus on beautifully presented, fresh, high quality food. Beer hopes the campaign will bring a much-needed change in regional aged-care homes’ approach to food. 

“This is a mission dear to my heart. So I am delighted to be working with Country Health SA in a project that has the potential to change the way we ‘do food’ in aged care in those facilities where beautiful, fresh food has not been a priority,”

One initial aim is to identify and celebrate aged care facilities that are already doing a good job. Another important step is to find ways to encourage facilities that are not already doing so to purchase fresh, seasonal, local (Australian) ingredients in the preparation of the food for residents.

However, how well elderly Australians eat is a matter for conjecture. Many aged-care providers may take exception to the suggestion that their residents do not receive an excellent food and dining experience.

In order to gain accreditation, and consequent funding, aged-care providers must already provide many things in their menus and food service (including choices at each meal to allow for personal preferences and cultural diversity).

The kitchens in aged-care facilities are tightly controlled environments of activity where the staff work hard in order to produce many meals and between-meals offerings each day. In that regard they are not very different to the pressured environment of a commercial kitchen in a well-patronised restaurant.

So what is the standard of food currently being served in aged-care homes in South Australia and nationally? What are the criteria on which these assessments are based? And, just how does one go about devising, funding and implementing an effective scheme (presumably a long-term national objective)?

A logical starting point is to benchmark the current state-of-play and then move forward from there. Beer’s initiative is ambitious, it promises much and it is engendering public interest. Now the Foundation has been established, and public donations solicited, we can hope to see the project implemented.

maggiebeerfoundation.org.au

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The Adelaide Review

Eastern Promises: Mother Vine and The Tasting Room

The reemergence of the city’s east end as a quality food and wine district continues with the addition of Mother Vine and The Tasting Room.

Rundle Street’s east end used to be a haven for food and wine lovers. It lost its appeal after many institutions closed and streets such as Waymouth, Leigh and Peel emerged as food and wine hotspots. This was exacerbated by the closure of the Universal Wine Bar last year, and it seemed all was lost for Rundle Street and its adjoining laneways.

But there were signs of life, as Ebenezer Place evolved into the food destination it had promised for many years with numerous cafes and lunch spots such as Hey Jupiter, Sad Cafe and Nano. And late last year, Rundle Street snagged the quality gastronomic destination it was waiting for with the opening of Jock Zonfrillo’s Street ADL and Orana.

One premium wine destination has been a constant throughout all these changes – East End Cellars. Michael Andrewartha’s much-loved wine retailer, importer and wholesaler, called Adelaide’s best wine shop by wine writer Max Allen, has been an institution on Vardon Avenue (which runs parallel to Rundle St, near Ebenezer Place) for 16 years. It has now moved across the avenue to bigger premises. It’s not just a larger space. The shop includes The Tasting Room, a licensed area where you can enjoy a glass of wine or two with food options including imported and local ham and salami, toasted sandwiches, antipasto and a Ploughman’s Platter.

Andrewartha is also involved in the premium wine bar Mother Vine, located in the old East End Cellars building. Due to open in the middle of July, Andrewartha is responsible for Mother Vine along with Amalfi ’s Frank Hannon-Tan, East End Cellars’ Pablo Theodoros and Master of Wine David LeMire from Shaw + Smith. The small bar license was the genesis for both the Tasting Room and Mother Vine. Andrewartha and Hannon-Tan want the area to be a food and wine hub and for their businesses to complement existing east end food and wine premises such as Street ADL and Orana, The Botanic and the National Wine Centre.

“There’s been a long tradition of wine bars in Rundle Street from the days of Universal and Tapas,” explains Hannon-Tan.

“And that space [Tapas] was a wine bar continuously from 1920s up until Tapas closed, according to Howard Twelftree [the late Adelaide Review food reviewer].”

Hannon-Tan, who owns Frome Street’s Amalfi, said he felt there was a change of direction on Rundle St when hospitality businesses moved out to be replaced by fashion shops.

“I think the pendulum has swung back and corrected itself with the laneways behind Rundle St,” he explains.

“It’s an equilibrium. I don’t want to criticise that period but it swings in roundabouts. I think this is a part of a balancing out of the city as well – there’s a lot happening in the west end and it’s provided an impetus to redevelop here. This is never going to be the late night precinct that it once was, and that’s not a bad thing.”

“We’ve both been in the east end for the same amount of time, about 16 years,” explains Andrewartha.

“It’s funny how we’ve now joined forces to open this new bar. I think both venues will work off each other fairly well. The Tasting Room is a lot smaller, it’s licensed for 75, but across the road [Mother Vine] we’re licensed for 120. This [The Tasting Room] is a not a late night venue, you won’t be hanging off the rafters at 2am, it closes at 10 o’clock at the latest. And across the road it will go to one o’clock on Friday and Saturday nights only but normally midnight, so they are not late night venues as such.”

Mother Vine’s wine list will be 300-strong and driven by Lemire.

“He’s looking at a wine list that showcases the best of independent winemakers in Australia and around the world, with a focus on France, Italy and Spain as well as some German wines.”

Andrewartha says the Tasting Room and Mother Vine will be separate businesses with different identities, as he’ll be the face of the Tasting Room and East End Cellars while Hannon-Tan, Theodoros and LeMire will be the faces of Mother Vine.

“Of course there will be some crosspollination of clients who will drink wine there and want to buy it here,” he explains.

“It’s about creating a wine hub,” Hannon-Tan says.

“When people think, ‘I want to go for a glass of wine’, it’s not necessarily a specific place but its about coming to Vardon Avenue, it’s about coming to the east end for a selection of places.”

eastendcellars.com.au
facebook.com/mothervinewinebar

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The Adelaide Review

Hot 100 SA Wines 2014

With many months of planning already under our belt, The Adelaide Review is excited to launch the 2014/15 season of the Hot 100 SA Wines with some exciting changes, which includes fresh judges and wine classes, as well as a new Chief Judge – Banjo Harris Plane. Harris Plane has been part of the Hot 100 team for the last two years as a judge and this year the Attica Manager and Sommelier steps up to be the Chief Judge for 2014/15.

The Hot 100 winners will be announced on Thursday, October 30, at the Queen’s Theatre. We will also launch the Hot 100 SA Wines publication at this event. 

The Adelaide Review will release a limited number of tickets for the public to purchase for the first time in the event’s history for the Queen’s Theatre soiree. The ticket price includes all tastings, canapés, entertainment and a unique opportunity to meet the Top 10 winemakers of 2014.

Tickets are now onsale; click here to purchase.

The Jam Factory will announce its Drink. Dine. Design emerging artist award at the launch. The Adelaide Review is a proud partner of this exciting award for the second year running. 

Finally, we would like to thank our 2014 sponsors. This wine show, event and publication would not be possible without their generous support.

 

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Longview

While music is always an important ingredient, it would be nothing without the encouragement of food and wine and I propose that if Julie Andrews had spent her glory days twirling about on the slopes of the Adelaide Hills, the songs may have turned out a little differently. In place of curtain-clad children picking fruit, there’d be vignerons and seasonal pickers gathering the best vintage bunches, and Sister Mary such-andsuch would be replaced with worshippers of the wine-variety, out of the convent and into the cellar, as is (the wine) god’s plan.

At the peak of this food and wine musical would be the Brothers Saturno – owners and guys-in-charge of the Longview Vineyard estate and all of its operations. Season after season they are the ones leading Longview’s charge and deliver a sensational performance in the art of food and wine.

One-hit-wonder winemakers of the ‘80s have a lot to answer for but thankfully the plight of under-appreciated Chardonnay is getting stronger after years spent in the buttery shadows. Longview’s Blue Cow is a dazzling example of a refreshed version, with only a light hint of oak and tastes of stone fruit and citrus that will suit even the most reserved of palates (while still pleasing judging panels around the country, considering the number of medals this drop has been awarded). Another favourite white is Queenie, a delightfully aromatic Pinot Grigio named after the owners’ nonna, Tarquinia (who received the fi rst bottle of this tribute as a surprise on her 90th birthday).

A Sunday matinee is the best (and only) time you’ll get to try the tapas menu at Longview’s restaurant or balcony bar, unless you are lucky enough to be invited for a special event or wedding. Course after course of bite-sized offerings and tasty treats are prepared in a kitchen of extras brought in to create the scene every weekend at this charming rustic restaurant space.

Longview serves a refined Spanish-influenced menu that includes an entrée starter of juicy marinated olives and grissini, spiced pumpkin dip that packs a punch, served with hand-made corn tortillas and a leek, potato and cheese tortilla. All simple ingredients, but seasoned and spiced precisely, and matched perfectly with the Willy Wagtail methode champenoise Chardonnay and Pinot Noir sparkling and hand-picked Iron Knob Riesling – gaining a gravelly mineral undertone from the estate hill where the grapes are grown.

Next come the main course dishes, jumping from the plates with colour and flavour. A smoked peppered chicken served with a chargrilled vegetable mix of capsicum, zucchini and eggplant atop a bed of baby rocket, drizzled in a marvelous house-made mayonnaise is the dish of the day, only slightly ahead of the mini slow-cooked pork and oregano pies (with the flakiest of pastries), served with a green salad and side of hand-cut sweet potato chips. A warm roasted carrot, lentil and labne salad comes next, coated in a well-balanced harissa yogurt that will get your tastebuds whirling. This does feature some fairly underwhelming BBQ lamb kefta, though.

Dessert is a cascading romantic vintage comedy of tiered cake stands, filled with naughty R-rated delights including salted caramel chocolate shards, almond butter cookies and petite chocolate éclairs, along with some divine little domes of vanilla and raspberry jube, sprinkled with lime sugar. It’s enough to make you blush.

The cheese plate that follows includes aged-Cheddar with candied walnuts, guava paste and fresh apple atop poppy seed lavosh. The perfect encore that leaves you suitably sated. McLaren Vale might be the gateway to the southern sea and vines, and the Barossa Valley may be consumed, but the Adelaide Hills are alive with the sound of vino, and Longview is full of your favourite things.

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The Adelaide Review

Adelaide’s Patio Coffee Roasters

There is a coffee drying method widely used around the world where the raw coffee beans are made into thin rows on large cement patios. The coffee is dried by the sun and is shifted every 30 to 40 minutes over six to 14 days. This method was inspiration for the name Patio Coffee Roasters and I believe it is also a symbol of patience, which is what’s needed when brewing, extracting and pouring the perfect coffee.

The boutique was full of toys and tools to make coffee enthusiasts feel like a kid in a candy store. The shelves were full of different beans with various characteristics but it was the Synesso coffee machine on the counter that was ready to make my day. The barista suggested I start with an espresso of Panama Boquete from Maunier Estate. It had a rounded grapefruit acidity that lingered in the mouth and started to sweeten as I sipped on.

I ordered the house blend called Compton St for my latte. Made up of beans from Brazil, Colombia, India, Guatemala and Papua New Guinea, it was presented with a symmetrical rosetta on top as the art and the taste was clean and bright with a hint of malt. The Tweedvale milk was textured beautifully and created an excellent mouthfeel throughout.

Patio Coffee Roasters is like a cellar door for the coffee scene and caters to all areas of the industry. They roast their coffee in-house and do all sorts of training onsite. If you feel that your skills are drying up or you would like to start the day right, then come and hang out on this patio for a relaxing coffee and a chat.

Patio Coffee Roasters
678 South Road,Glandore

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The Adelaide Review

Cheese Matters: Fondue

Depending on your era you may or may not be familiar with fondue. This sharing experience of food was totally hip and groovy in the 70s,when fondue parties were the dinner party of choice. It seems the roots of fondue lie in Switzerland, where it was promoted with slogans such as “fondue is good and creates a good mood”. Over time many countries around the world adopted fondue.

Special little pots were required, with distinctive forks that have long stems, lots of melting style cheese and yummy food bits to put on the end of your fork to dip into the hot cheesey liquid.

The fondue pot is quite a cute little thing that generally sits on a stand and has a little burner underneath in order to keep the fondue warm and in a liquid state. The fondue pot became a very popular wedding gift in the 70s. I recall many people telling me when I was looking for fondue pots for CheeseFest last year, they still had the one they were given for a wedding gift in the shed or on the top shelf in the pantry room. Well, if you have one bring it out! Fondue has once again become a popular gastronomic experience, one we should all try at least once.

The cooler weather now is begging for a fondue session to happen. So here’s how you go about it. Of course if you do not have a fondue pot, visit your local op shop, they are sure to have a couple stashed on their shelves.

Now, the important bit – the cheese. You must choose the correct cheese in order to produce a really good fondue. Select from quality Gruyere, Edam, Emmentaler, sharp Cheddar or even Camembert.

There are many recipes for fondue. Once you start looking it is quite surprising. Even celebrity chefs have a few takes on this groovy offering. The first recorded fondue recipe was in a 1699 book which was published in Zurich under the name Käss mit Wein zu kochen which translates to ‘cooking with cheese and wine’.

It simply asks for one cup of grated or cut cheese to be melted with wine and to dip bread cubes into it. While the foundation is there, a few more ingredients really go a long way in shaping some great flavours for you to enjoy.

Fondue should be runny and stringy, not thick and stodgy, and the key to achieving this is using cornflour and white wine. The cornflour prevents the proteins in the cheese coagulating and the acidity in the wine keeps the cheese stringy. Here’s my favourite recipe, which I discovered when looking for fondue recipes for the Funky Fondue Lounge at CheeseFest last year.

Cheese Fondue Recipe

Ingredients

• 450g gruyère cheese, grated
• 450g comte cheese, grated
• 15g cornflour
• 30ml sherry
• 2 thyme sprigs
• 3 garlic cloves, bashed
• 500ml white wine
• 1 tbsp lemon juice
• 5g English mustard powder
• 1 pinch ground nutmeg

Method

1. Start by mixing the grated cheeses with the cornflour in a bowl, then bring the sherry to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the thyme and garlic then remove from the heat and allow it to infuse for a few minutes. Strain and allow to cool. Bring the wine and lemon juice to the boil in a medium saucepan, then add the cheese, a little at a time, stirring continuously until it is glossy, smooth and creamy.

2. Now add the infused sherry, mustard powder and ground nutmeg. Stir those into the cheese and wine and continue to stir until the fondue thickens.

3. Transfer this to your fondue pot and serve with cubes of sourdough bread and crudités. I love cornichons, olives, radishes, asparagus, cherry tomatoes and mushrooms as seasonal  dippings.

4. It is important to make sure the cheese fondue mixture is kept warm enough to maintain a smooth and liquid mixture, but not so hot that it burns. For something a bit different, replace the wine with beer or cider, the flavours are great.

Another type of very popular fondue is the chocolate fondue. Personally I am not a sweet tooth, so I will stick to the cheese version but I am acutely aware I could be in the minority there.

Try melted Toblerone in some good dark chocolate with a titch of your favourite liqueur, something like Grand Marnier. Now the dippings for chocolate fondue can be interesting. Anything from marshmallows, chunks of banana, milk bottle lollies, and the perfectly sensible strawberry all work a treat.

I can hear you now: “Have you seen the old fondue set?” I hope I have encouraged you to dust it off and enjoy the “good mood” that fondue creates.

Kris Lloyd is Woodside Cheese Wrights’ Head Cheesemaker
woodsidecheese.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Hanuman

The location of this extension of Chef Jimmy Shu’s national restaurant empire seems a little strange.

South Terrace hotels are not the most inspirational of Adelaide’s accommodation, and the Grand Chifley Hotel’s dated exterior and tired entrance lobby doesn’t give a good first impression when entering the restaurant sited just opposite the reception desk. Moving through the refurbished dining space is a little more rousing but even a fresh coat of paint and some Danish-style imported furniture can’t help you shake the feeling that you’re about to dive into the hotel’s weekly buffet special. The idea of ‘views over the hotel pool’ would usually add a touch of grandeur, if only the pool wasn’t surrounded by chunky with plastic furniture overshadowed only by the unpleasant façades of nearby buildings. We can’t always choose our neighbours, I suppose.

We arrive during a very quiet lunch hour, confirming that although the location may help keep the overheads down and be convenient for after-hours parking it is not attracting the daytime crowd of more centrally-based dining haunts. Only one other table is occupied and the food and beverage staff seem a little surprised when we arrive, continuing to set tables rather than show us to one. After a little confusion we are seated and service picks up, with menus and wine landing promptly and some menu suggestions offered by the staff and accepted by us; their knowledge of the dishes gave reassurance that we made a good choice and were in for a gastronomic treat from across the seas.

Six little tapered earthenware lids surround a pool of lime and chilli sauce, each one hiding a succulent seafood surprise. Lifting the lid reveals fresh oysters swimming in a subtly sweet and slightly spicy liquid. Simple and delicious. This is Hanuman’s signature dish, and one that I’d happily eat by the dozen. Lingering tastes of lemongrass and ginger get the taste buds dancing and the heat from the chilli is enough to notice but not to undermine the oyster’s delicate flesh.

The first sign of the Indian influence to the Hanuman menu comes next: a Kashmiri chicken tikka marinated with yogurt, ginger and Kashmiri chilli, balanced thoughtfully with a fragrant rose petal garam masala. I imagine that better can only be tasted alongside views of the Himalayan mountains, and this dish is best eaten dunked in the minted yogurt and wrapped in the most delicious roti bread served alongside. It’s here that you really begin to realise that with food like this as the focus, interior (and exterior) design struggles of this oriental haven can be forgiven (even the preformed sandstone deities that I just noticed lining the purple fluorescent lit walls).

It is a difficult challenge to make a curry look photo-worthy but the duck, roasted then simmered in a coconut and red curry sauce, infused with kaffir lime leaf and Thai basil and topped with a sprig of a chilli bush, makes this one the exception, and dare I say it kind of ‘cute’. Strike a pose, you delicious looking dish. Delicious tasting too. Large chunks of pineapple and lychees sweeten the flavour and while perhaps could be seen as a little common, there is nothing like a good classic that is executed well – especially when served with a lemongrass martini, it was past noon, after all.

Less attractive, but still on the mark with flavour and balance, is a combined seafood dish, wok-tossed and seasoned with hot basil and oyster sauce. Lovely and succulent scallops are the heroes here, with the delightful sauce greedily mopped up with leftover roti – both of these too good to waste.

Hanuman is decidedly the best house on the worst street based on its culinary delights. Fresh, fragrant and exciting dishes meld Asian cuisines in perfect cohesion; it’s just a shame about the view.

Hanuman
226 South Terrace
8359 3500

hanuman.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Reds put a seal on the Wicks success

Tim Wicks is unlikely to forget how he makes his living – with his home slap bang in the middle of a hundred acres of Wicks Estate vineyards, his view on all sides comprises vines, vines and more vines, relieved by occasional stands of redgums.

There are constant reminders, too, when out and about, as the Wicks label – its stylised wax seal creating a fat drip of scarlet on white – is a highly visible presence in restaurants, pubs and bottle shops.

It’s surprising to learn that Tim and his business partner and brother, Simon, branched out from civil construction and property development to begin their venture into wine only 14 years ago, planting out their newly purchased Woodside property with Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Shiraz.

The idea of becoming vignerons was not pure whim – the brothers Wicks grew up amidst their family’s orchards and nursery business in the foothills around Highbury.

The orchards were eventually turned over to the creep of urban sprawl, with part of the proceeds purchasing Wicks Estate.

“I guess we just wanted to stay involved with some form of agriculture,” Wicks says.

In addition to owning their own vines, building a winery was integral to their grand plan: “We wanted to be completely self-dependent and control our own destinies. We didn’t want to have to rely on the majors to buy our grapes and be dictated to by them, so we took the path of making our own label and selling wine under our name.”

It was Sauvignon Blanc that initially led the charge for Wicks Estate.

While happy to put his agricultural knowledge to work in the vineyard, Tim Wicks prudently stopped short of trying to make the wine himself. When the flash new winery was put in on the property in 2004, expert help was only a few hillsides away in the form of family friend Tim Knappstein.

Knappstein is a pioneer and virtuoso maker of Sauvignon Blanc in South Australia, and the elegant whites he made for Wicks quickly picked up prizes as well as a popular following, and they continue to defy the deluge from New Zealand. The winemaking at Wicks, especially among the reds, also enjoys the Barossa-based experience of Leigh Ratzmer, whose previous jobs include a stint at Torbreck.

In the past few years, the reds from Wicks have begun to follow the lead of the whites, with the 2012 vintage a standout. In addition to its The Adelaide Review Hot 100 SA Wines top 10 spot, the 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon won gold (and best wine in class) at the Adelaide Hills wine show, as well as the Winewise Small Vignerons varietal trophy. Meanwhile, the Shiraz took gold at Perth and Adelaide. With few of the Wicks range retailing for more than $20, it’s a remarkable record.

Tim Wicks is happy to play up the Estate’s cool climate credentials.

“The market seems to be getting more accepting of light-to-medium bodied styles,” he says.

“We’re not making reds in the big blockbuster style; the wines are food-friendly, they have a lovely, soft tannin structure and drink well early. They’re really approachable wines.”

While both brothers and their families still muck-in during vintage, their growing success has led them to enlist the services of another family wine company, Angoves, to handle distribution.

While they have made some efforts to export their wines, and they do sell into China and the Netherlands, their focus remains the local market. Tim Wicks is well aware that hard work lies ahead to avoid the tough times that have befallen many small-to-medium-sized wineries.

“We’ve managed to buck the trend, and while we don’t want to become the biggest winery in the Hills, we do want to continue our growth path.

“Offering high quality, good value wines is the way to do it.”

wicksestate.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Combi Coffee

We are finally starting to see the boutique coffee world pour into events and festivals around town through the likes of portable coffee vans. Combi Coffee is one of the creative pop-ups you can’t miss, not only due to it being a vintage 1972 kombi van but becuase it has a coffee machine built into the back. They use the locally roasted coffee from Kommon Grounds and offer different single origins and blends depending on what’s in season and the event they’re attending. 

On this day, I found Combi Coffee at an outdoor event called Unley’s Double Shot Coffee Fiesta. When I saw the mustard color van from across the oval I naturally drifted towards it. Although it was very busy, the barista was still able to have a chat to me about coffee, which tells me they must love what they’re doing. He suggested I try a Guatemala Antigua for my espresso, which he handed straight to me from the machine.

The first sip produced a bright and pleasant acidity with hints of soft spice but the aroma of coca came through towards the end.

The latte was made from a blend called Combi Coffee Blend, which was made up of beans from Brazil, Colombia and India. The crema was a perfect colour and sat around the latte art of a rosetta leaf. The taste of roasted walnuts was predominant at first but the chocolate berry flavours came through with the after taste. It was a pleasant cup of balanced characteristics.

Combi Coffee can be found at a range of different events around Adelaide ranging from small local markets to large music festivals such as WOMADelaide. They live up to the title of being a pop-up boutique by popping up in front of you at an event and serving you coffee at a boutique level of greatness.

Combi Coffee is found at various events around Adelaide

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The Adelaide Review

Food For Thought: Grass Vs Grain

This all started when I endeavoured to find out what makes a great a piece of beef. But I found myself running around South Australian cattle farms on information overload instead. I discovered great beef really depends on what you want – buttery and creamy tender meat or complex flavours with texture. For me, it is the latter but, like most, I wouldn’t say no to an intensely marbled piece of Wagyu. The fl avour all starts with what the animal ate, how the animal lived and how it was slaughtered. Flavour most certainly does not come from the elaborate spice mixes and rubs, which seem to be flooding the supermarket shelves.

My journey started on a 400-acre Fleurieu Peninsula-based farm. The rolling hills were littered with free roaming cattle and lamb. But I wasn’t there to see them; I was really there to see the grass and what it did to the flavour of the beef after careful butchering on their residential processing facility. It didn’t disappoint; it was as if the fields of grass, and even the weeds, had enhanced the ‘meaty’ taste. It wasn’t, however, traditionally tender, it needed some good oldfashioned chewing but this only extracted more of the flavour and made my steak all the more satisfying.

If you like melt-in-the-mouth tender beef, then grain-fed is most likely the one for you. A rich diet of grains, and random additions like almond hulls, make for a more rounded and creamy flavour profile. There is, however, a lack of complexity, one could even say it’s one-dimensional. Traditional techniques of fi nishing cattle solely on grain, seems to have lost some of its traction in the market. The thought of taking cattle off the pastures around them and replacing their diet exclusively with grain is a hard concept to swallow when we are all trying to make more ethical and sustainable decisions. 

After talking to a handful of farmers, it is clear that consumer demands for grass-fed beef is triggering a large amount of discussion and movement in farming practices. Both grass- and grain-fed beef have a place our meat industry but it is very clear that the debate is only just getting started.

twitter.com/annabelleats


Recipe: Bread and Butter Pickle

Ingredients
• 4 large cucumbers – thickly sliced
• 2 brown onions – halved, thinly sliced
• 2 teaspoons salt
• 400ml apple cider vinegar
• 230g caster sugar
• 2 teaspoons celery seeds
• 2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
• ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
• 2 bay leaves

Method
1. Place the sliced cucumbers, onion and salt in a colander, resting over a large bowl. Mix thoroughly and leave for 20 to 30 minutes.
2. Bring the apple cider vinegar, sugar, spices and bay leaves to a boil and reduce to a simmer.
3. Lightly rinse the cucumbers and onions and add them to the simmering apple cider vinegar.
4. Turn the heat off and leave to steep for 10 minutes.
5. Spoon the pickles into sterilized jars (I use them straight from a hot dishwasher), seal and turn upside down for five minutes. Store sealed in a dark cool place for up to a year.

 

Recipe: Sloppy Joe

Ingredients
• 500g coarsely ground
(grass- or grain-fed) beef mince
• 1 red onion – diced
• 2 tins whole tomatoes
• ½ cup tomato sauce
• 3 tablespoons brown sugar
• 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
• 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
• Salt
• 10 small brioche rolls


Method
1. Heat a large frying pan over a medium heat with a glug of oil. Fry the diced onion until soft and translucent.
2. Add the beef mince and fry until browned and any liquid has evaporated.
3. Place tomatoes, tomato sauce, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, Dijon and a large pinch of salt into a blender. Mix until smooth and add to the mince.
4. Bring to the boil and reduce to a simmer until it has a thick and rich consistency.
5. Adjust the seasoning and leave to rest for 10 minutes before serving (it is even better reheated the next day!) Serve alongside brioche rolls with the crunchy bread and butter pickles.

 

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The Adelaide Review

Game Of Rhones: Wine is Coming

A Game of Thrones-themed wine tasting event will discover which wine rules them all.

First held in Melbourne last year, Game of Rhones will spread its wings to Brisbane and Adelaide over the coming month and a bit. The brainchild of Dan Sims (Bottle Shop Concepts), Game of Rhones is a lighthearted take on wine tasting, with winemakers and punters dressing up in costume from the wildly successful HBO fantasy show based on the Song of Ice and Fire series of books by George RR Martin. The event, which includes tasting wine infl uenced from the Rhone region in France, follows Bottle Shop Concepts’ mantra: “We take the wank out of wine.”

Sims explains that it was a friend of his that came up with the title Game of Rhones.

“He’s not a wine person at all, which is great as I have to pitch my ideas to him and I fi gure if I can get him excited, I’m onto something,” Sims says.

“But yes, I am a mad Game of Thrones fan and I was keen to do a Shriraz/Grenache event but needed the right angle to make it fun. ShirazPalooza doesn’t quite have a ring to it.”

Last year, Sims took PinotPalooza to Brisbane, which gave him the confi dence to send Game of Rhones up there. As for Adelaide: “It’s a logical choice seeing some of the best known Shiraz based wines/wineries are at its doorstep.”

Sims said last year’s Game of Rhones event was “hilarious”.

“Having some of the winemakers dress up in costume was brilliant and it immediately made people feel at ease. We had medieval music playing as well as actors (in costume) walking about. We also had a torture room where we held blind tastings (blind folded that is) and we put liquids in their mouths. As I said, hilarious! As for being different, it’s a whole package. We want it to be fun and engaging. And yes, it is possible to go to a wine event and actually enjoy yourself.”

Then there’s the actual game, where guests get to vote for their favourite wine.

“We have some of our ‘staff’ walking around with iPads asking people to vote for their favourite wine on the day, as well as the best dressed producer.”

There will be 45 wineries part of Melbourne’s event and just under 30 for Adelaide. Torbreck’s Run Rig was last year’s winner.

“Thankfully they’re back to defend the title,” Sims says.

“We’ll do the same voting system and have city favourites as well as an overall winner to make it interesting.”

As for improving on last year’s inaugural event, Sims says they are looking at better food options for this year’s series, as well as sourcing local beer and cider.

“We’re working with local caterers/food trucks to work with us in terms of food. In short, yes, we’re keen to have some fun with food and link it as much as possible to Game of Thrones.”

Game of Rhones
Published Arts House
Saturday, May 24 (1pm to 6pm)

bottleshopconcepts.com/gameofrhones

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The Adelaide Review

Game of Phones

Ever since I can remember, humankind began fast forwarding through mobile devices like someone scrolling through a YouTube video to get to the best bits. We have grown accustomed to machines going from totally essential to completely obsolete, mobiles thrown into the abyss alongside puree swiping and 62-degree eggs. All we are doing is pretty much surrounding ourselves with technology that is designed to distract us.

This is bullshit... especially for a restaurateur.

The sole reason I got into cooking was so I could cook and connect. There is no better feeling than having someone enjoy an experience that you have put together, from the food and wine to the company. It’s a performance akin to theatre and no one wants to be distracted by a buzzing phone or flashing lights when you have paid good money to be entertained right?

Wrong – we crave constant stimulation and the smart phone has become an integral part of the dining landscape.

The problem we now face in the restaurant industry is that more people are taking photos of the food, décor and wine, which take away from the overall ambience. On Saturday nights I could light up Waymouth Street on the power generated by iPhones in the dining room and still have enough electricity to take a cat selfie.

You know what the menu and wine match is before you have even walked in, as well as what to expect by from the kitchen, so there is no element of surprise left. I’m generalising. But there’s definitely a higher base-level of expectation.

It’s tricky for a chef. On one hand we know that the dish the front of house has placed in front of the diner is first looked upon through the lens of a smartphone, the description etched into a comment box and posted before anyone has had a chance to taste the dish. On the other hand it’s free advertising, our food broadcasted to a plethora of potential customers, counting the likes and shares, deciding on your next signature dish by the amount of shares the photo has – that’s when the cons become blurred.

Social media has become ‘word of mouth’ and the amount of people that comment online about their experiences is staggering.

Everyone has now become a critic and as soon as something is posted, it’s out there for the world to see. It can be used for good or evil and there is no responsibility or accountability especially when negative reviews are posted anonymously such as:

“MY WINE WAS NOT POURED EXACTLY 60 SECONDS BEFORE OUR MAINS CAME OUT!!!

SCANDELOUS!!” By WInEFiend 87

Or

“WE PAID $50 FOR THREE COURSES!!!!! RIPOFF!!!!!!!!” By Diner#Catselfie69

It sounds like an exaggeration; it’s not. It’s human nature and technology has left us hopelessly spoiled. We whine like disappointed emperors the moment a restaurant does anything other than pander to our every whim, why? Because now we have an audience. But I’m talking about someone else there, of course. Not you, precious readers and potential diners, not you – after all you are the ones who ultimately blah blah let me pat you on the head blah. Bless you, whoever you are.

You know a complaint is serious or a compliment extremely sincere when it’s handwritten. And even now, because these words too will appear on the internet, I know someone, somewhere, will be formulating a complaint in their head.

Like all things we need balance, we need to be honest in our expectations, enjoying the meal for what it is, and stop comparing notes.

Next time look around the restaurant you are dining in, count how many people are gazing lovingly into their Instagram accounts and consider putting your phone on silent, starting a conversation with your partner and enjoy the experience... then feel free to Tweet about how awesome or crap it was. Within the industry we appreciate the support the online community gives us and take on the chin the constructive feedback, even if it’s not what we want to hear. However, just remember to respect the establishment, put down your phone and eat your food.

* I use my phone more than any other human in Christendom.

Duncan Welgemoed is the Executive Chef of Bistro Dom and The Happy Motel

bistrodom.com.au


thehappymotel.com

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The Adelaide Review

Review: Orana

“After a week in Sydney, a week in North Queensland and a weekend in Melbourne, I’m going to finish my holiday with a couple of days in Adelaide. I’ve heard it’s pretty quiet there?”

I realised I’d just been charged with a mission after hanging up the phone. If it takes changing the misconceptions of a visiting Brit one at a time, then so be it. Until recently some of our overseas cousins hadn’t even heard of our city – despite the fact Adelaide is named after one of their queens – but as our food and wine renaissance continues, so grows our invigorated resolve.

With no time to get away, activities needed to remain local and at the top of my list was Jock Zonfrillo’s Orana – the restaurant the Scottish ex-pat launched last year after a few years at the helm of Magill Estate.

We stopped downstairs for a quick aperitif at the Street ADL bar. Before our guest could finish the phrase, “I went to a bar like this in…” we whisked him out, via the darkened side alleyway and up the vine entangled staircase, opening the lit doorway into the minimalist vestibule of Orana. Here is where I will draw some similarity to places I’ve dined before, but those places were 10,000 miles away on the banks of Stockholm’s islets. Sparsely decorated with arbitrary Scandinavian furniture and a row of bespoke wine-filled fridges along one wall, the style here is radical for Adelaide and certainly something new for Australia.

The word Orana translates to ‘welcome’ and is exactly how you will feel from the moment you enter until the moment you walk out. The service is exquisite. The staff are professionals who make it their life to make the dining experience more than just about the food (which is superb, incidentally). This is dinner and a show, without the smoke and mirrors.

In a subtle flurry, dishes began arriving soon after we took our seats. The first round of ‘tastes’ included a crisp saltbush, kutjera and sour cream bite. Crunchy, woody, smooth and tangy at the same time – Orana’s contemporary take on the salt and vinegar crisp – it was served alongside a beef tendon with macadamia and quandong (more familiar names, but a newly discovered combination of flavours). Next came the goat’s cheese with a quarter of beetroot, smoked for 12 hours over a fire pit. For such a small and unassuming dish, this one packed a punch with pronounced flavour and a smoky sweetness that had taste buds around the table tingling. Then, tiny carved toothpicks with skewered slivers of dry-age South Devon beef, mountain pepper and lilly pilly, and a smoked Goolwa cockle.

The ‘Alkoopina’ tastes went on – 19 different morsels bursting with flavour, and all this before the main event. The last of these piquant delights came disguised as a palate-cleansing sorbet, a guessing game of sorts – but you’ll need to test this one yourself, the tactics of war and all that gaff.

And now for the heroes: another nine to be precise.

Peas, by reputation, are generally plate fillers; buttered or minted, or pureed at best, but here they stand tall and wild upon a pile of muntries, wild plum and cinnamon myrtle. Too good to stop scooping from this perfect little dish, matched impeccably with an Italian Tiberio Pecorino – that’s a wine, not a cheese, just so we’re sure.

It was around about now that our traveller friend came up for air and exclaimed an excited “Oh” as the next main was laid out on the table. It was his first taste of kangaroo since landing in the country and once devoured I warned him he’d never try better. With a thick buttery sauce of mountain pepper with balanced spice and a slightly sweet undertone, scattered with the leaves of an ox eye daisy.

The succulent flesh of Kangaroo Island marron came next. Similar to yabbies, but three times the size, these small-clawed creatures are not as well known (or eaten) as they should be. The chef made the best use of the tail, limiting additions to finger lime and aniseed myrtle to give a slight hint of sapid tang to complement the mildly sweet taste.

Karkalla might be familiar to those who’ve spent time along the coastline, generally seen as a succulent weed but who knew it could taste so, well, succulent? Topping a fillet of black face Suffolk lamb, with fermented ruby saltbush berries and a bite-sized side of haggis, this is certainly a lamb dish, but not as you know it.

With three ‘sweeter’ dishes to go, our march continued. Through fields of young riberry leaves with unpasteurised goat’s cheese, and a sensually satisfying native currant with coconut cream, defeated only by the set buttermilk with strawberry and eucalyptus – each dessert washed down with their very own liquid complements.

They only do degustation dinners at Orana, and that’s all they need. With only 24 seats, intimacy is not a problem and the seamless service will make you feel like you’re the only guests in the room. Well, the only ones who matter, at least. Despite a reasonably hefty price tag, Orana doesn’t cut corners and they don’t want anyone to miss out. You’ll sit through at least 20 different tastes and dishes and you will almost certainly love it, especially when you let their chief drinks-guy (Josh Picken) match the wine.

And so we will soldier on with this culinary public relations challenge to reignite Adelaide as the go-to destination one re-initiated Brit at a time, with the help of a local Scotsman at the helm, no less.

Orana

285 Rundle Street

8232 3444

restaurantorana.com

 

Photos: Jonathan van der Knaap

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The Adelaide Review

Duncan Welgemoed Wins Howard Twelftree Award

The Adelaide Food & Wine Festival celebrated its final weekend with an event to remember (Garden of Eden) at Fall From Grace in Willunga, which included the presentation of the inaugural Howard Twelftree Award.

After a deliriously good fortnight filled with fine food, wine and company, the festival sought to thank the people among us who make Adelaide’s food scene what it is.

The inaugural Howard Twelftree Award recognises an individual’s outstanding contribution to our city’s gastronomical culture. The award is named for the late Howard Twelftree (AKA John McGrath), a respected and well-loved food writer for The Adelaide Review who sadly passed away last year.

“I really loved his writing; I was a huge fan,” Amanda James-Pritchard, AFWF Director, explains. “I noticed on Facebook that a really great friend of his, the artist Timothy John, had mounted a campaign for a plaque for him in the Central Market. So I spoke to a few people who knew him, like Amanda Pepe, and said, ‘I really want to create an award; I think the Festival could have this award that would be in his memory and would live on forever and ever and ever’.”

From there, the prize was an effort spearheaded by his friends. It was agreed that an annual award would be given, and that this year’s recipient would be Duncan Welgemoed, who was presented with the bespoke Jam Factory-designed award by wine writer Philip White. It was a unanimous decision that should come as no surprise – Bistro Dom’s Welgemoed (who was the brains behind the First Fruit degustation dinners at Lola’s Pergola) has been draped in too many awards and accolades to name.

The 2014 Howard Twelftree Award was presented at Saturday night’s Garden of Eden event at Fall From Grace, which featured food by Welgemoed and The Happy Motel and wine from Fall From Grace, Jauma and BK Wines.

Photos: Ben McGee

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The Adelaide Review

Random Cups of Kindness

“A free coffee when you’re down-and-out is heavenly,” Damo Carroll says, sipping at a freshly brewed latte with a neat milk foam rosetta artfully drawn on top.

The Port Adelaide man knows only too well what life is like on the poverty line. A plumber and self-confessed alcoholic, Carroll came within a hair’s breadth of homelessness after losing his licence and then his job for drink driving two years ago.

Now Carroll, 38, has become the unlikely champion of a program helping connect the needy with free coffees across Adelaide, a spin-off from a humble tradition that began in the Italian city of Naples some 100 years ago. Called caffè sospeso or ‘suspended coffee’, customers would pay in advance for another who could not afford a cup of coffee.

The elegant pay-it-forward, anonymous act of charity and kindness – in which the donor often doesn’t meet the recipient – waned as the Italian economy picked up postwar but made a comeback in recent years as the eurozone battled a long-running economic crisis. The tradition quickly spread around the world, including the US, Canada and Japan, and arrived in Australia last year. In Adelaide, more than 15 cafes are now involved.

But some Adelaide cafes have found connecting those in need with a hot cuppa challenging. In Port Adelaide, the Red Lime Shack on St Vincent Street has devised its own solution, cards bearing two tokens that can be redeemed for two coffees or one smoothie, which are given to local counsellors and non-profit group coordinators to be handed on to the disadvantaged.

The cards are also given to Carroll, who has proven a secret weapon in connecting the needy with the scheme. “[Red Lime Shack] is using me as a conduit because I’m out there busking and I can see people in need, the lower demographic or whatever, the type of people who can’t afford to give a busker a dollar,” he says. “I’ll call them over and say ‘hey, would you like to try these coffees? Don’t worry, the community’s already paid for it, the community did that for you’. And they go ‘me?’ They want to give me the shirt off their back. They’re so thankful.”

The program’s success likely lies in its simplicity. Ian Steel, a 46-year-old political research officer who lives and works in Port Adelaide, says the system provides a “really easy opportunity” to contribute to those less fortunate in his own community. He has donated about 30 coffees since stumbling across the Red Lime Shack’s scheme last year.

“I’ve seen workers doing really well, others out of jobs in really tough times, so I appreciate that anybody can find themselves scratching around for a dollar,” he says. “I’m really lucky, I’ve been in paid employment for most of my life, I can easily afford to hand over a few extra bucks. For working people who have a bit of disposable income, it’s an affordable way of making a fairly small contribution which is often much more meaningful than it seems.”

Red Lime Shack owner Stephanie Taylor says about 420 coffees have been suspended since she launched the cafe’s scheme last July and 320 have been claimed by local battlers - single mothers, troubled teens, people with mental illness and women experiencing domestic violence.

Taylor agrees that each cup of coffee represents something far greater than a simple caffeine hit. “For some people they’ve actually never walked into a cafe in their life, they’ve never thought they were worthy, as if it was something that only someone of worth could do,” she says. “But they’ve realised that anyone can go into a cafe and have a coffee and sit down and not be judged and they’re now quite comfortable to do so.”

Other cafes have teamed up with non-profit group Another Step Closer to ensure donations not redeemed in-store reach those in need. CEO Oliver Pfeil says Pages Cafe within Waymouth Street’s Koorong Bookstore recently handed over $800 to the Women’s and Children’s Hospital food program, while the Lunch Bar on Payneham Road gave almost $200 to homeless agency, The Hutt Street Centre.

Lunch Bar owner Debbie Beelitz says often customers open their wallets and give much more than just the couple of dollars needed to cover a coffee. One woman who donated $60 told staff how she had experienced homelessness as a youngster. “I guess it’s easier than having to go find a charity and it’s local,” Beelitz says.

Social media has played a large role in bringing more cafes onto the scheme and getting the word out to the community. Carroll hopes it continues to grow across Adelaide. “It gives people a break from the grind and it breaks down barriers. I feel like Santa Claus when I’m doing it,” he says.

To find participating cafes in Adelaide and across Australia, head to suspendedcoffee.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Heston Blumenthal to move The Fat Duck to Melbourne

It was 10am at Crown Melbourne Resort and a media call was set up in the lobby – complete with a riser for the many attending photographers and videographers. When word gets out that celebrity, three-Michelin-star chef Heston Blumenthal is in town, and making an announcement at Crown Resort, you can guess what it is, but there’s still an attraction to see it live.

Blumenthal takes the stage (shorter and handsomer, in case you’re wondering), clocks the crowd and evidentially finds it larger than expected, “Flipping hell, there’s quite a lot of you,” he says as an endearing aside.

“I guess you’re expecting me to announce the opening of a new restaurant – I’ll come onto that in a minute, but in fact, what I’m going to announce now is the closing of a restaurant,” says Blumenthal, “I’m going to shut the Fat Duck and bring it here to Melbourne.”

After a beat of silence there’s applause and even a few whoops.

“It will be the furthest migration a duck of any kind, let alone a big fat duck, has ever made,” says Blumenthal.

The reality is The Fat Duck is moving to Melbourne whilst the Bray site in the UK, built in 1640, is renovated. “I want to make a really important point here – it’s not a pop-up restaurant, this is not a guest chef coming over and doing a few weeks or a period of time in somebody else’s restaurant, we are going to pick up the Fat Duck, the whole team, and fly them over. We’re even going to pick up some of the bits of the restaurant – maybe the sign maybe some leather from the chairs and incorporate it into the dining space of the new Fat Duck,” insists Blumenthal.

Although it may not be a pop-up of The Fat Duck, it is a temporary incarnation under that moniker and with the UK team.

“The plan is at the end of the year when we close for our annual Christmas shut down the staff will go off on their Christmas break and then in January we’re all going to fly here and the plan is to open The Fat Duck here in February and then we’ll run for six months and then at the end of that, we close the duck and we return to the UK. When The Fat Duck leaves, in the same space that it occupies [in Melbourne] we’ll leave behind a permanent restaurant and that’s Dinner by Heston Blumenthal.”

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The Adelaide Review

Think.Talk.Food>Wine Reader Offer

We don’t want to name drop, but, Think Talk Food Wine has some of the most dynamic, influential, forward-thinking people and provocateurs in one place.

On Tuesday April 8 at the National Wine centre as part of the second annual Adelaide Food & Wine Festival we invite you to participate in a food and wine forum with a difference. It’s going to be a melting pot of ideas, thoughts, creativity, people and provenance. Within the setting of the national wine centre we hope to encourage dialogue, discussion and debate along with birthing some great ideas that will have the potential to change the game in South Australia.

As with any regular forum there will be opportunities for networking, education and conversation but where TTFWSA takes a great leap forward is that every voice that attends counts and has an opportunity to participate and be heard.  Our theme for the day is “competition or collaboration” and 20 speakers, leaders in their fields, will each have five minutes on this topic. After a lovely lunch and wine tasting from the Hot 100 the forum will break into groups with speakers as mentors to brainstorm ideas with either competition or collaboration at their base. These will then be presented back to the forum. One idea per group.
We know TTFWSA will stir things up, create movement and celebrate South Australia, with tangible outcomes.

Get along, it’s going to be amazing. All food and wine is included in the cost for this event.

The Adelaide Food and Wine festival are offering Adelaide Review readers a 10% discount off of the purchase price. Your code is:  ADLreview

By Gil Gordon Smith and Amanda James-Pritchard

Click here to purchase tickets and enter your code

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The Adelaide Review

Gin Long Canteen

I was warned to expect a wait in line when visiting North Adelaide’s latest Asian offering. Gin Long Canteen has moved into the space formerly occupied by a much less exciting oriental offering and has made all of the right changes to create an electric mood and buzzy atmosphere, complete with neon signage and oversized mosaic wall hangings. A diner-style eatery, literally spilling out onto the pavement on O’Connell Street, with an updated interior and effective use of every surface available for eating their refreshing fusion menu.

Though unfortunate enough to be stood behind a group of complaining types not au fait with the marketing ploy of a no booking policy for groups less than six, our short wait for our table did give us time to soak in the sights and smells and to notice a familiar face working frantically in the open kitchen. Chef Nu Suandokmai has taken up residence after a short stint opening Golden Boy in the city, bringing his signature style into an eatery that has already created some noise on the culinary scene.

I do love a good play on words, but decided to skip past the Gin Long ‘Liesling’ (see what they did there?) and there was a collective groan at the table having noticed the ‘Yellow Fever’ mandarin daiquiri. The fun and frivolity of this venue does get the thumbs up for its ‘how to eat rice paper roll’ instructions on the menucum-placemat, though I wished there were some at hand to try our skill as we waited for dishes to land. Seated at a booth style table, one of many options in this jam-packed space, it’s cozy yet open enough that you don’t feel too claustrophobic; kind of like Ikea I suppose.

On advice from our cheerful waitress we started with the signature Gin Long Pandan infused gin. It arrived sealed in a ‘quirky’ plastic bubble-tea cup and was perfectly alcoholic but not as exotic or as infused as expected. The stab-it-yourself giant straw while functional in getting through the plastic layer was not the most pleasant to drink from, either. Big Gulps can stay at the footy.

Making some of our own decisions proved a winner, with a much more palatable Longview ‘Boatshed’ Rose in preparation for the spice of our first few dishes. (The wine glass also verifyied itself as a much less comical method of getting liquid to mouth.) The Miang Kam is a sweet and spicy little Thai snack with flavors of tamarind and crunchy kai lan leaf, and the Betel Leaf Cigar was a great starter, dipped in a nuoc cham sauce – an Asian meatball, if you will. Both tasty and setting us off on an adventure of balance and flavour.

As the main dishes arrived we realised we might have gone a little overboard when ordering. The dishes are all quite large, and thankfully all quite delicious. The pomegranate chicken features pan-fried chicken with more sweet tamarind and a hint of spice in the delicate sauce scattered with fresh pomegranate – easily my favourite dish of the night. The waitress had certainly got this recommendation spot on, though I may have felt a little less nexclusive as it landed on every other table around us. Popularity can be a fickle thing.

I badly wanted to try the spicy caramel chicken but to avoid the potential of same-same, and on negotiation with my dinner dates we went with the lychee duck curry – another delicious yet unassuming dish piled with cherry tomatoes and pineapple, topped with finely sliced chili and Thai basil; clean flavours with the perfect amount of heat. Lastly we tucked into the slow braised Thai beef ribs with cinnamon and Thai basil, along with a side of Vietnamese coleslaw. This melt in your mouth dish was bursting with fl avour though would have been best eaten first as we reached our dietary consumption peak.

Just as we came to terms with the imminent (overloaded) trundle home, complimentary crème caramel and chocolate mousse desserts arrived courtesy of the chef and to thank us for the slight delay between courses. A lovely gesture though these seemed out of place on an otherwise interesting Asian menu and were regrettably left as we made our way through the still crowded venue to settle the bill and depart.

Gin Long Canteen
42 O’Connell St, North Adelaide
7120 2897

ginlongcanteen.com.au

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The Adelaide Review

Premium Punks

Taras Ochota tells The Adelaide Review about the small batch of premium wine he made with Maynard James Keenan, A Sense of Compression.

Last summer, American rock band Tool hit a hiccup as they toured Australia. Just before their Adelaide concert, frontman Maynard James Keenan fell ill with a sore throat and had to postpone the gig by a day. So the rock star headed up to the Adelaide Hills, to a little winery tucked beside a hill in Basket Range, where he rested his vocal chords over a home cooked meal and joined local winemaker Taras Ochota in making a small batch of premium wine.

The seed of this star-powered collaboration stretches back some 15 years to when Ochota was a scruffy young vineyard hand, playing bass in a punk band named Kranktus. The band was briefly popular, even played the 1996 Big Day Out festival, but eventually split in 1999.

“That’s when I got more focused on making a living from wine and not just playing the top string of my bass and screaming with a distortion pedal,” Ochota, 43, says.

After ticking off an oenology degree, Ochota and his wife Amber hit the road, following seasonal vintages across the hemispheres and travelling in-between. It was during a surf trip down to Mexico in their battered Volkswagen camper van that the couple resolved to create their own Ochota Barrels wine label. “We thought we’d make some Grenache because no one was into Grenache. It was the underdog variety,” Ochota says. “Everyone was into Shiraz here in Australia. Everyone sort of pooh-poohed Grenache, it was a bit low-brow.”

Ochota Barrels launched in 2008 but not without a nod to Ochota’s punk rocker past, with their prized Grenache named Fugazi, after the American punk band of the same name. That caught the eye of US wine importer and punk nut Ronnie Sanders, who insisted the Ochotas have dinner with his friend Keenan, the wine fanatic rocker who runs his own vineyard in his spare time.

“We hired a car and drove out through all the crazy meth lab areas, two hours out to a little place called Jerome in Arizona where Maynard lives,” Ochota recalls. “He’s a bit of a maverick out there. But to me his music seems like his day job. That’s what he does and it pays the bills and that’s what he’s always done but his passion is wine. He loves it.”

The following year, when Keenan toured Australia with the 2013 Soundwave music festival, Ochota invited him up to Adelaide Hills to hang out, check out a vineyard and make some wine. The pair pressed the grapes together two months later when Keenan returned with Tool.

“They came here, we had a nice lunch, basket pressed with an old ratchet on the front verandah, just pressed it straight to barrel and that was it,” Ochota says. “We didn’t make much. We didn’t want to be greedy, we just wanted to make something special that we’d enjoy.”

They named it A Sense of Compression, just 919 bottles co-fermented with a dash of Gewürztraminer to “make the wine pop”, most of which sold out just four days after this year’s March 1 release.

It’s a phenomenon the Ochotas are becoming accustomed to. Last year, when James Halliday awarded their 2012 Shiraz 97 points – beaten only by Henschke’s Hill of Grace and Penfolds Grange – the phone rang hot with orders but everything had already been snapped up. Still, there are no plans to grow beyond the small batches that Taras and Amber, with the help of Ochota’s father Yari, can handle themselves.

“That’s where we want to be, where people are going to enjoy our wines because they’re a bit more artisan and have hopefully a bit more character, they’re not your big bulk market wines.”

Ochota aims for lean and savoury winemaking, making picking decisions based on the grapes’ natural acidity rather than their flavour. “It makes the wine a bit tighter and feminine and elegant,” he says. “At the same time we manipulate time on skins, so the wines are a bit more savoury and have a textual element that makes them different. That’s our main focus – texture.”

But, he says, the idea is not to do too much. “Less is more. It’s a hands-off winemaking style,” he says.

Did this theory spur last year’s win in the national Young Gun of Wine awards? “Could be. Doing bugger all. Lazy winemaking,” Ochota answers with a grin. “The other thing that helped is [that] the photo on our website was taken 18 years ago or something, so I still look quite young.”

ochotabarrels.com

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The Adelaide Review

Adelaide Food and Wine Festival

The Adelaide Food and Wine Festival is back for its second year of scrumptious offerings and The Adelaide Review will present two events during the April festival.

As it did in 2013, the festival will play host to a swathe of events celebrating the best Adelaide and South Australia can put on your plate and in your glass.

This year’s festival has regional and metropolitan sides to it. On one hand it will pay special attention to Adelaide CBD’s foodie hotspots, like the Central Market, the East End and the National Wine Centre. On the other, South Australia’s celebrated wine regions will play host to days and nights of revelry and fine dining in McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, the Coonawarra and the Adelaide Hills.

Keeping with the times, many of the Adelaide-centric events are themed around laneways, organic produce and discovering secrets of the city. Expect to see picnic en masse accompanied by a live Peter Combe performance, musical cruises on the Torrens and the return of the ever-successful Fork on the Road. Vegan, coffee and bacon enthusiasts will also be pleased to know tours have been catered to their individual tastes.

As a festival partner who has this year matured to a ripe 30 years of age, The Adelaide Review will be hosting the Garden of Eden event at the Fall from Grace winery. Fresh from a storming success running the food for Adelaide Festival's Lola’s Pergola, Duncan Welgemoed and the Happy Motel will cater the Garden, while Max Allen waxes lyrical on the ancient story of winemaking in clay amphorae. Garden of Eden will also pay tribute to food writer Howard Twelftree.

There is an element to the festival for those who want their intellectual palette satisfied as well. Presented by the National Wine Centre and The Adelaide Review, Think.Talk.Food>Wine will see speeches on innovation and tradition from prominent figures in South Australia’s food and wine industry. Meanwhile, history connoisseurs can expect a full course from Baudin and Flinders to Don Dunstan.

The Adelaide Food and Wine Festival may only be in its second year, but with such a broad menu of delicious events, it is hard to see it not coming back for thirds.

Adelaide Food and Wine Festival

Friday, April 4 to Sunday, April 13

adelaidefoodandwinefestival.org

Garden of Eden

Fall from Grace, 29a High St, Willunga

Saturday, April 12, 6.30pm to late

Host: Max Allen. Food: Duncan Welgemoed and The Happy Motel. Wine: Gill Gordon-Smith. Cost: $85

adelaidefoodandwinefestival.org/home/portfolio/garden-of-eden

Think.Talk.Food>Wine

National Wine Centre

Tuesday, April 8, 9am-5pm

Speakers: Sue Bell, Christina Belpiro, Mike Bennie, Amanda Daniel, James Erskine, Ross Ganf, Sally Johnson, Richard Gunner, Banjo Harris Plane, Chloe Reschke Mcguire, Trevor Maskell, Josh Picken, Warren Randall, William Skinner, Pablo Theodoros, Wendy Umberger, Duncan Welgemoed, Tim Wildman, Paul Wood and Stephen Yarwood.

Cost: $75, concession: $40

adelaidefoodandwinefestival.org/home/portfolio/think-talk-foodwine

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The Adelaide Review

Food for Thought: Honey

I really love honey and until a couple of years ago I didn’t realise that I wasn’t eating the real thing!

Under pressure from consumers and retailers, a large portion of the honey industry made a decision to give us a smooth and runny honey, reminiscent of liquid gold, but in fact, the value is as far from gold as can be.

Honey is an example of natural perfection; it is reported to have anti-viral, anti-bacterial and even anti-fungal properties. Honey is also full of powerful enzymes, antioxidants, natural vitamins and nutrients. Unfortunately, this is not what is readily available to us on a consumer level. It is often heated to refine the texture and increase the shelf life but a consequence is the removal of nearly all of the health benefits that were once naturally present.

You have to wonder when and/or who made the decision to sacrifice the health benefits so that we could spread it on our toast. Clever advertising campaigns, such as runny honey in a bear shaped squeeze bottle (now I think about it, not so clever) kept us wanting more.

Lets face it, honey can be messy and sticky; the ease of it almost spreading itself on our toast is an extremely tempting ploy. But now we know what we are giving up, it almost seems unfathomable that such an option was even considered.

Bees still pollinate one third of the world’s food supply and they have been successfully thriving on Earth for around 50 million years. There is even evidence that we have been gathering honey for around 8,000 of these years. It is safe to say that bees and honey are an extremely natural and important part of our evolution but the question is – what role will it play in our future?

Look for raw and/or low-temperature processed honey and be careful of the ‘organic’ label, it doesn’t always mean that the honey hasn’t been heat-treated.

And, if you feel so inclined, plant beefriendly flowering plants. This will help keep natural pollination of our food supply going and also contribute to the creation of one of earth’s most natural, nourishing and delicious foods - honey.

Baked Honey Cheesecake

Baked cheesecakes can be intimidating, as they have a tendency to crack when baked but the addition of a sour cream glaze hides all imperfections!

Ingredients
• 200g Nice biscuits or equivalent
• 30g butter – melted
• 875g block cream cheese – room temperature
• 150g sour cream
• 4 eggs
• 2 tablespoons plain flour
• 4 tablespoons raw honey
• 250g sugar
• 2 egg yolks
• 100g (extra) sour cream
• 2 (extra) tablespoons raw honey

Method
1. Line a spring form base cake tin with baking paper and for extra security, lightly grease the base with some of the melted butter.
2. Process the biscuits until the consistency of fine sand.
3. Add the butter and pulse until combined.
4. Press the mixture into the base of the lined tin.
5. Bake the base at 180 degrees for 12 minutes and then leave to cool.
6. Reduce the oven temperature to 160 degrees.
7. In the bowl of an electric mixer, using the paddle attachment beat the cream cheese until smooth.
8. Add the sour cream, eggs, plain flour, honey and sugar, beat until well combined and a smooth consistency.
9. Beat in the egg yolks, one at a time allowing the mixture to combine between each egg.
10. Pour the mixture into the tin and tap gently to remove any air bubbles.
11. Bake for 60 minutes or until just set and slightly golden brown in colour.
12. Allow to cool completely at room temperature.
13. Combine the extra sour cream and honey until a pouring texture.
14. Pour over the cooled cake and leave to chill in the fridge overnight.
15. Remove from the tin and garnish with seasonal fruit.
 

twitter.com/annabelleats

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The Adelaide Review

Adelaide Food and Wine Festival 2014

From social media post to eight-day, 30-plus event food and wine extravaganza four months later – the Adelaide Food & Wine Festival came out of nowhere last year to deliver a festival this town was waiting for.

The Adelaide Food & Wine Festival returns this April. Although the program won’t be out until March 11, Creator and Director Amanda James-Pritchard believes there will be between 40 and 50 events in 2014, including this year’s signature event – the Town Picnic. James- Pritchard says planning for this year’s festival is travelling at the speed of a freight train.

“We’re so far ahead of ourselves,” she explains, “if I think about where I was this time last year, let alone two weeks before. It’s fantastic. It’s all coming together really well. There’s always a few red herrings in the mix, but that’s what happens when you try and do things that are a bit out of the ordinary.”

Some of these out of the ordinary events include the return of the Don Dunstan Tribute Dinner at Fino, regional celebrations at five iconic South Australian food and wine regions such as the Adelaide Hills, Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale and Think. Talk. Food>Wine, a forum featuring speakers such as Feast’s Richard Gunner, winemaker James Erskine, Lord Mayor Stephen Yarwood and wine journalist Mike Bennie. Think. Talk. Food>Wine’s theme is ‘Collaborators or Competitors’ and is presented by The Adelaide Review.

James-Pritchard, who moved to Adelaide from Melbourne six years ago, previously was a publicist for the Melbourne Food & Wine Festival and runs Kooki PR. In late 2012, she posted on Facebook about a plan to start a food and wine festival. After support from food and wine identities, James-Pritchard commenced organising. Four months later the inaugural Adelaide Food & Wine Festival was staged with 30-plus events, as well as its big-ticket dinner – Market Feast at the Central Market. Punters and producers alike embraced the festival, guaranteeing a return this year.

“It just snowballed. I thought maybe we’d have 10 events and I was really planning it around this after-hour feast at Central Market that to me felt it would be the hinge of the Adelaide Food and Wine Festival.” 

Held on Tasting Australia’s off year and when there was doubt as if the biennial event would return (it is, from April 27-May 4 with Simon Bryant and Paul Henry in charge with Maggie Beer as its patron), James-Pritchard believes this fresh air was part of its success. 

“Who knew what was happening with Tasting Australia and I just thought, ‘Well if I don’t do it now, someone else will do it’. It was a now or never thing, that’s why it came together so quickly. I had been thinking about it for the six years I’d been living in Adelaide – literally the first minute I started working in Adelaide I had the idea to have an Adelaide Food and Wine Festival.” 

The Festival hit Adelaide at around the same time that our gastronomic scene exploded with exciting new bars and restaurants.

“That’s just a fluke,” James-Pritchard comments on the timing.

Lachlan [Colwill] made his way to Hentley Farm and with Duncan [Welgemoed] at Bistro Dom and Jock [Zonfrillo] leaving Penfolds/ Magill Estate to start Orana, it is a very exciting time in food. Since I’ve been here the wine’s always been exciting with emerging varieties, but I think with the more restaurant-side of things doing well it gives people a chance to focus on the independent winemakers, people like James Erskine [Jauma] and Taras [Ochota Barrels].”

This year’s major event is the Town Picnic, which is an old school themed picnic, held at Rymill Park with guest Peter Russell-Clarke, as well as chefs Salvatore Pepe (Cibo) and Jimmy Shu (Hanuman). James-Pritchard is planning to attract thousands of people to the retro picnic, which includes a dogfriendly area for dogs and their owners.

“I’m trying to recreate my best ever family picnic from when I was a kid because I think everyone has fond memories of that. There will be four different corners of cuisines with an old school slant and North Adelaide Country Women’s Association are doing a cake stool and picnic hampers.”

The grass-roots, not-for-profit and community-driven festival has a team of about 30 volunteers including ambassadors Gill Gordon-Smith (Fall From Grace) and Rebecca Sullivan (Dirty Girl Kitchen).

“I said to them that they can be as hands off or as hands on as they want. I’m not going to push them to do anything really, except to be really great ambassadors for the festival and they have been. They’ve both done amazing things so far.”

Ultimately, James-Pritchard says she is like a party planner – as the Festival is about people enjoying themselves.

“It’s about connecting people to producers, produce and places. It’s about exploration and discovery but ultimately having a really, really good time. ”

Adelaide Food & Wine Festival 
Friday, April 4 to Sunday, April 13


Think. Talk. Food>Wine
Tuesday, April 8 (9am-5.30pm) National Wine Centre

adelaidefoodandwinefestival.org

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The Adelaide Review

Duncan Welgemoed: We’ve Got Balls

Bistro Dom Head Chef Duncan Welgemoed writes about Adelaide’s gastronomic resurgence, a locally nurtured movement that is about substance over style.

Adelaide has balls. Formerly known as the city of churches, Adelaide is now described as the new Portland; however, as Samuel Johnson put it, “No one ever became great by imitation”.

We can’t deny that we have been the butt of a few jokes until quite recently. Sometimes it’s been utterly deserved. When I first arrived in Australia, I was always asked why the hell would I want to live in this state. It was believed that we didn’t have the populace or demographic that could sustain interesting restaurants and cool bars. We should have been named the city of ‘shnitties’ (nothing wrong with a great parmi) but the recurring theme was that the people of Adelaide would not be open to change, or able to warrant something brave and different (unless it was promoted on the next episode of MasterChef).

Like every noteworthy movement, it started from the earth, the terroir – and in this case, from the primary producer. In the last five years, there has been a slow and steady movement from producers who have driven a more artisanal approach to their growing, husbandry and the fi nishing of their products. The sellers, whether farmers’ markets or wholesale suppliers, have ensured this quality product reaches our chefs and you, as the consumer, taste the point of difference. South Australian produce (rather than another soonforgotten celebrity chef) is the heart of this resurgence in our once-waning food scene.

With this all-permeating product confidence, our chefs have pretty much given the finger to whatever the next fad coming from Melbourne and Sydney is. We are producer-focused, not personality focused and having every producer engaged in the process allows each player to bring their A-game, whether they are running a small bar or a restaurant, and even those of you who cook and curate at home.

Why emulate trends from other cities when we can carve our own niche, cultivate our own style and have so much fun doing it that we don’t even look over our shoulder to see what the big boys from elsewhere are up to?

We are also very lucky to have close relationships with incredible winemakers; for me this is the heart and soul of my operation. Every release of brilliant local wine brings inspiration (without sounding too sycophantic). These cats can change the way you plan your next dish, the structure of the menu, even convince you to call in sick, open a bottle of wine and spend the night heckling the next carbon-copy reality TV cooking show.

We are becoming a state of doers. We pride ourselves on substance over style and we have that in bucket-loads; the style naturally follows.

For a while this state suffered from a hospitality brain drain because we haven’t been as dynamic as other places. What’s fantastic about this ‘renaissance’ is that more young people are deciding to stay, invest and create. This has been a quick progression and, if anything, I worry that it may soon start to suffer from market saturation – this is where we need you, the consumers, to support the creative businesses. Tell your friends, have a party, head out and fi nd the latest exciting place, because there’s no shortage of them.

We are extremely lucky to have grass-root food festivals such as The Adelaide Food and Wine Festival, which encapsulates the collaborative ethos shared between producer, chef, winemaker and customer. The festival has been an exceptional platform to throw caution to the wind and let everyone have a bit of fun. Corporate sponsors do not dictate these events, which means the narrative is pure.

I’ve been lucky enough to be given the opportunity to curate the food and beverage at Lola’s Pergola (The Adelaide Festival’s club) in conjunction with Ross Ganf, Creative Director of the club and The Happy Motel. Collaborations have emerged between unbelievable chefs, winemakers, producers, performers, party-boys, designers and artists who have a deep connection with this movement. We all have the same goal; to bring love, passion and, occasionally, a little weirdness and thrust it centre stage. What we do in this state matters - people far and wide are starting to look and get excited about what we’re doing.

This Adelaide Festival club is presenting everything that Adelaide’s food and wine culture should represent minus the spin and politics but with the highest integrity. I’m extremely proud to be cooking and living here and frankly even from a tourist point of view, as English satirist and columnist Charlie Brooker wrote when describing South Australia for The Guardian: “If the rest of the country gets any better than this, it’s quite frankly taking the piss as a nation.”

Duncan Welgemoed is the Executive Chef of Bistro Dom, The Happy Motel and Lola’s Pergola

bistrodom.com.au

thehappymotel.com

adelaidefestival.com.au/2014/club/lolas_pergola

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The Adelaide Review

Sustainable Wine

The ebb and flow of season, the constant tinkering and unpredictable impact of nature, the advances in research, raw intuition when nurturing a vineyard, the imprint of human labour versus the ease of mechanising – all of these things conspire when considering sustainability and wine. It’s a funny thing, lending definition to something that feels a bit indefinable.

First thing is first; the growing of grapes should be managed with environmental impact in mind. Organic and biodynamic farming tend to be the best practices, with the latter not only creating a farm-bound ecosystem forged from a waste-not-want-not application of viticultural practice, but an effective recycling of farm- generated product (and waste in the form of manures and composts), that work towards a home-grown sustainability.

Sustainability is, however, a bigger picture. Goals of sustainable growing are emphatically based on relative quality increase of wine grown from sustainable farming practices, and though a change and evolution to more sustainable growing requires a leap of faith for many who consider conventional farming safe and practical, its impact is a bigger picture, locally and globally

The value of sustainability isn’t to be quantified by trifles of higher points from critics or a new found adulation from wine cognoscenti, but a spiritual and environmental connection to place that isn’t always measured in terms of proven pecuniary worth, but in a feeling that connects responsibility to nature in a link to the toil of the farm. Sustainability, whether pitched to or proven, brings winegrowing closer to nature, with less chemical and environmental impact, and works to protect and enhance the environment, locally and further afield.

Key elements of sustainability can be quantified, though variances are prevalent. Soil health and fertiliser management form the basis for most benefit of sustainability, but it is coupled with pest and disease management and encouragement of biodiversity that not only benefits the growing of grapes, but a broader environmental program. Added to this are water- and waste-management programs, and following all of this comes the social impact – the benefit to local communities. Finally, for those seeking business advantage, the removal of non-sustainable product and practice costs that beleaguer a farm, forms part of the sustainability benefit.

In a remarkable step forward, and emphatically supported by the New Zealand government, New Zealand wine has implemented a sustainability charter that requires adhering to, for participation in sanctioned NZ Winegrowers events. Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) was established in 1995 and provides, in essence, “a framework for viticultural and winemaking practices that protect the environment while efficiently and economically producing premium wine grapes and wine”. Since its inception in 2007, approximately 94 percent of all vineyards are now SWNZ certified (2012 statistics), with around 20 percent of vineyards being farmed organically. It’s making a decided impact.

A similar program has been established in McLaren Vale wine region of South Australia, with a 37 percent growth in participation seen in 2013, and a total of 53 percent of all grapes crushed from the 2013 harvest working with the McLaren Vale Sustainable Winegrowing Australia principles. The regional initiative is a first-of-its-kind program in Australia and “provides growers with the means to improve practices in a way that optimises sustainability of both their business and the region”.

The McLaren Vale system works a practical application of the program with self-assessment and data reporting key to the initiative and developing of practices, fostered through a group setting. Increasingly, wineries around Australia are implementing their own measures, but these are often best suited to existing winery practices or the rigmarole of marketing and marketability, rather than making full blown steps to sustainability.

To ascertain sustainability credentials is difficult without a community or industry standard or charter. Asking questions is always the first step – if you choose to make decisions that bring to your kitchen free-range eggs over cage-grown, or you source or grow your own organic vegetables, you elect lamb cutlets that are organic, grass-fed and free-range, you are already buying into ideas of process and provenance. With this, sustainable wine goes hand-in-hand. Where wine is grown and how it goes to bottle must form part of your next and on-going conversation

 

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The Adelaide Review

Noodle Nights

Over the next four weeks the newly developed entertainment precinct on the River Torrens will be hosting street food, markets and music, as the Blue Hive on Riverbank Promenade will play host to the Friday Noodle Nights + Markets.

Four Asian food vendors will do their thing consecutively over the four Fridays, and be accompanied by a set of local musicians. The Adelaide InterContinental Hotel will also be selling noodles from their own pop up bar every Friday night.

Kids are free to play in the Imagination Playground and the Goodwood Arthouse Marketplace will have fashion and art on show from a selection of Adelaide’s designers and artists.

This week kicks off on the 21st with Ginza supplying the sushi while Adelaide songstress, Delia Obst, supplies the tunes.

In the following weeks, Nu Thai, Phat Buddha Rolls and Indochina will be serving street food to the masses, while Banjo Jackson, Sascha Marsh and Andy Mac entertain.

Johnny Yung, owner of Ginza and Indochina said, “The Blue Hive at the Riverbank Promenade is an ideal spot to meet with friends before heading down to catch a Fringe show.”

Friday Noodle Nights + Markets will be open 4pm-10pm, February 21, 28 and March 7, 14 on the Riverbank Promenade (adjacent to the Dunstan Playhouse). Admission is free.

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The Adelaide Review

Lobethal Road Triumphs Again

Adelaide Hills winery Lobethal Road Wines took out the top honour at the 2014 Royal Sydney Wine Show yesterday, winning Best Wine in Show.

The husband and wife owned winery also won Best Red in Show and Best Shiraz in Show for their 2012 Lobethal Road Shiraz. These trophies follow Lobethal Road’s (owned by Dave Neyle and Inga Lidums) recent success at the Adelaide Hills Wine Show, where the boutique winery won Best Wine in Show and Best Chardonnay for the 2012 Bacchant Chardonnay.

“It’s absolutely fantastic to receive the Best of Show Award as an endorsement of our approach to viticulture and winemaking, as well as acknowledgement of the Adelaide Hills as a region that produces high quality red as well as white wines,” Dave Neyle said in a press release. “The Adelaide Hills is known for producing aromatic whites, such as Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Gris, premium Chardonnay and sparkling wines. It’s less widely known that it also produces elegant reds, including Shiraz. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank our winemaker Michael Sykes.”

Other major South Australian winners include two trophies for Rosemount Estate’s 2012 GSM and Wolf Blass taking out the Best White Wine for its 2012 White Label Chardonnay.

To read a recent Adelaide Review feature on Lobethal Road head here: adelaidereview.com.au/food-wine-coffee/article/adelaide-hills-lobethal-road

lobethalroad.com

sydneyroyal.com.au

 

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The Adelaide Review

Food For Thought: Street Food

There is no better way to discover the soul of a country than to eat your way around the landscape and embrace the local food. I once met a person who while on vacation in Bangkok, only ate pasta at their hotel due to a fear of what would be on offer in the bustling streets below. One could argue, why travel? What’s the point of visiting a country if you can’t taste what life is like for the people who call it home?

For me, discovering new cities is all about the food and the people that line the streets serving it. Street food instantly makes most of us think of Asia and the food served on the lively streets of India but in fact, in one form or another, street food is present in all cities around the world.

The abundance of eels in the River Thames during the 18th century were put to good use with the creation of the original street food of London, the humble pot of jellied eel. Due to its popularity, mainly in the east end of London it started the eel, pie and mash revolution. However, the demand for jellied eels has since significantly declined, resulting in only a handful of small vendors still serving this signature British street food.

Wieners graced the shores of America in the 1800s with the influx of European immigrants and one of the most famous American street foods was to follow.

Wieners were sold from Dog Wagons all along the eastern coast of America and with the addition of a bun and condiments the humble wiener is now the iconic American hotdog. Would a trip to the Big Apple be complete without one?

Large shallow pans full of chickpea batter are baked in wood ovens all along the Côte d’Azur and are enjoyed by the locals from Nice to Pisa. The variations along the coast highlight the local produce found in abundance; thinly sliced artichokes or onions, wild rosemary and in its home town Genoa served with crispy whitebait.

There is no doubt that food is a universal way of connecting and although sometimes confronting, once embraced is an amazing way to break down cultural barriers. Forget the restaurants when in a new city, hit the streetsand find out what the locals are eating.

Socca Recipe

This is an excellent gluten free dish for warm summer lunches. Top the chickpea crepes with any salad of your choosing but tomato and mozzarella is a particularly delicious combination.

Ingredients
• 1 Cup chickpea flour (organic does make a difference)
• 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
• 1 ¼ Cup of water
• Salt

Method
1. In a large bowl combine the chickpea flour, olive oil and a large pinch of salt.
2. Whisk in the water until you have a consistency similar to pouring cream.
3. Cover the batter and leave in the refrigerator for six hours or, if possible, overnight.
4. Heat a crepe or non-stick pan with shallow sides to a medium heat.
5. Spray with olive oil spray or add a tiny amount of olive oil
6. Add a ladleful of the batter to the pan and tilt to evenly coat the pan.
7. When bubbles come to the surface and it starts to shrink away from the pan around the sides, it is ready to turn.
8. Cook for a further three-to-five minutes until slightly golden brown on both sides.
9. The first one never works so have a taste and check the seasoning, adjust as required.
10. Eat warm with a light sprinkling of sea salt and cracked pepper or serve with a light salad.

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The Adelaide Review

Food Review: Daniel O’Connell

Behind the facade of a hundred-and-something-year-old building comes an enchanting tale of adventure.

This story isn’t one of faerie castles, sniggering leprechauns or fearsome hags, but a fable of wondrous beasts tracked locally from paddock to plate and butchered in the depths of the scullery; recipes torn from the pages of folklore and prepared in a flurry of delectable activity; nose, tail, and everything in between. From the heart of the kitchen to the smoked heart of an ox, matched impeccably with oyster, cornichons and capers. This is the tale of the Daniel O’Connell.

Still suffering from a time when Irish pubs received wicker and glass-panelled makeovers, the frontage maintains its heritage while some recent touches have brought the important parts of this hodgepodge venue up to date without worrying too much about cohesion. With exposed beams, brick surrounds, and ye olde timber joinery, the interior is rounded off with clunky furniture, chesterfield couches, and whiskey on display.

There’s something to be said about Irish cuisine, and it certainly isn’t potatoes. It’s black pudding with a fruity finish of peach and apple and radish. The idea of imperious blood sausage disappears when the dish lands. Served as a cube and topped with fruits it delivers an alluring scent.

The only comparison I can suggest is an American brownie – bittersweet and velvety, with a hint of chocolate to boot. Alongside is another starter, a dollop of bone marrow custard served with lavosh and gherkin (and a large hunk of the blood pudding brownie).

Not quite enough lavosh-to-custard ratio, we use the house-made sourdough bread to mop up the rest and move on to round three. It’s steak tartar, but not as you know it – and aptly named Dead Romance. I’m guessing that the personality of ‘loveable rogue’ sous chef Phil Whitmarsh shines through in this dish. Whitmars is second in command to head chef Aaron Gillespie, who is a Manse graduate and most recently peddled his wares at Grace the Establishment. These two make a formidable team; together they are building quite a reputation while creating a culinary destination.

Back to the rest of the share menu and I made a measured decision to avoid the peculiar sounding (though according to our waitress, surprisingly delicious) Pig Ear ‘Schnitty’. I appreciate the nod to Adelaide’s pub favourite, but it was back to the kitchen with that little auricle, bound for someone with less discriminating taste. I moved on to the liver parfait instead, this one served with a portion of duck breast fi llet accompanied by prune, cherry and pain d’epice – another sweet element of spice cake.

The kitchen prepares dishes with minimal waste, and I was determined to eat in the same fashion. Full but determined, two main courses arrived: Saltbush mutton, peas, parsley and ricotta, and Mulloway Brandade. The ol’ ram was given the royal treatment and the simple additions let the cut speak for itself – coated in a master stock that topped things off nicely. The Mulloway Brandade with crisp egg, trotter and grains was the lightest of all the dishes, and served with a side of spiced yogurt-coated carrots. Delicious.

The local wines are as enticing as this culinary tale, though I’ve seen most of these on lists around town before. A Yangarra Roussane served well with the entrees, and a French Vermentino followed. I’ve heard whispers of monthly culinary feasts titled Table for 10 where the guys will serve themed selections to highlight the season and tickle your buds.

If you’re Irish (at heart) and feel like a tipple then the Jameson Whiskey flights might be for you, or perhaps a flight of their exclusively imported RC Lemaire range of Champagne. Whether the Irish legend is true or not I’ve got my three wishes ready: beef shin, bone marrow and a chocolate stout dessert – he can keep his pot of gold.

The Daniel O’Connell Pub And Dining
165 Tynte St, North Adelaide
8267 4032

danieloconnell.com.au
 

 

 

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The Adelaide Review

The Great Grasby: Marion Grasby

Food identity Marion Grasby is returning to Adelaide for the Cellar Door Wine Festival, where the MasterChef alumni, cook, food columnist and author will host a series of master classes as well as a long lunch.

Grasby, who worked as an ABC journalist in Adelaide before studying gastronomy, recently moved to Bangkok due to her Marion’s Kitchen range of products. In Thailand, the MasterChef Magazine and Taste columnist can be close to her suppliers as well as travel around Asia for inspiration, ingredients and recipes.

“Marion’s Kitchen has become the main focus of what I do now,” Grasby explains about the ingredient kits, which include Thai Green Curry, Pad Thai and San Choy Bow.

“I love it because I can travel around Asia looking for cool dishes and flavours, spices and ingredients and turn them into packs that everyone back home in Australia can use everyday. It really made more sense to be in Thailand where my producers and suppliers are based. It means I can be out there and making sure everything is happening the way I want. If I want to design new products I can head out and chat to the guys about it.

It was a Marion’s Kitchen-focused move but at the same time, Bangkok’s pretty awesome. The city is famous for its fried chicken. There are street vendors on every corner selling fried chicken. Who doesn’t want to move to a city with fried chicken on every corner? Every time I walk to the office I walk past the grilled pork lady, the papaya salad lady and the fried chicken man – it’s such a delicious city.”

The master classes Grasby will host at the Cellar Door Wine Festival are Summer Entertaining, Asian Favourites and the Decadent Valentine’s Day Extravaganza.

“The cool thing about the master classes – because this doesn’t happen with every sort of food demo I do – is that you get to come along to taste the food and we run through the cooking of the dishes, so it’s really exciting.”

Like her Marion’s Kitchen products, Grasby’s events at the Adelaide Convention Centrebased festival will have an Asian influence.

“I guess because of the way I cook and my family heritage, and I’m based in Asia now, a lot of my dishes have an Asian flavour. But the cool thing about coming to South Australia is that there’s such amazing South Australian produce – the dishes will have a little Asian flavour but I will definitely use local produce.”

Grasby’s new book Asia Express will arrive this May and is based on recipes Grasby collected travelling through Asia.

“I’ve been lucky enough to travel to South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam, so it features recipes from all over Asia. I always like to say I collect recipes rather than souvenirs, and when I can I smuggle in bags of peppercorn or spices – that’s not illegal in Thailand, I would never do that in Australia!” she laughs.

“I guess they’re recipes I’ve collected on my travels over the last couple of years, which is really fun and also I’ve made them [the recipes] very quick, most of the recipes you can complete in about 30 minutes.”

Cellar Door Wine Festival
Adelaide Convention Centre

Friday, February 14 to Sunday, February 16

cellardoorfestival.com.au

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The Adelaide Review