Tarnanthi returns with first glimpse of 2019 festival program

South Australia’s annual celebration of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art is back in 2019.

Now in its fourth year, Tarnanthi will return in October to bring together the work of over 1000 First Nations artists from around Australia for a city-wide showcase of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contemporary art.

The yolŋu artists of Arnhem Land will take centre stage in AGSA’s flagship 2019 exhibition, with Gurruṯu set to showcase artists working out of Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre in Yirrkala, north-east Arnhem Land. The work of artists from the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands in north-west South Australia will also be highlighted throughout the festival, including the unveiling of a significant new work from Ngupulya Pumani of Mimili Maku Arts.

from left; Unknown south-east Aboriginal artist, Digging stick, 1800s, Victoria, wood; Registered 1988, unknown source, Australian Museum, Sydney, photo: Rebecca Fisher. Unknown south-east Aboriginal artist, Digging stick, 1800s, western Victoria, wood; Registered 1982, Donated by Mr Charles Melbourne Ward, Australian Museum, Sydney, photo: Rebecca Fisher. Eugene Von Guérard, Australia, 1811 - 1901, Early settlement of Thomas & William Lang. Salt Water River Port Phillip, N.S. Wales. March 1840, 1866-67, Melbourne, oil on canvas; M.J.M. Carter AO Collection through the Art Gallery of South Australia Foundation 2016. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide.
Bunha-bunhanga, from left; Unknown south-east Aboriginal artist, Digging stick, 1800s, Victoria, wood; Registered 1988, unknown source, Australian Museum, Sydney, photo: Rebecca Fisher. Unknown south-east Aboriginal artist, Digging stick, 1800s, western Victoria, wood; Registered 1982, Donated by Mr Charles Melbourne Ward, Australian Museum, Sydney, photo: Rebecca Fisher. Eugene Von Guérard, Australia, 1811 – 1901, Early settlement of Thomas & William Lang. Salt Water River Port Phillip, N.S. Wales. March 1840, 1866-67, Melbourne, oil on canvas; M.J.M. Carter AO Collection through the Art Gallery of South Australia Foundation 2016. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide.

Bunha-bunhanga: Aboriginal agriculture in the south-east will see Wiradjuri/Kamilaroi artist Jonathan Jones interpret the research of Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe, reflecting upon Pascoe’s writing which highlights sophisticated agricultural practices of pre-colonial Aboriginal societies long ignored by settler societies. Jones explores these themes through the contrasting imagery of historical landscape paintings and Aboriginal tools drawn from museum collections.

The much-loved Tarnanthi Art Fair will also return to Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute in 2019, bringing together creations from 50 arts centres around Australia in a rare opportunity for art lovers and artists to explore and directly support the breadth and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders contemporary artists and their work.

2018 TARNANTHI Art Fair; photo: Nat Rogers.
2018 Tarnanthi Art Fair (Photo: Nat Rogers)

The complete 2019 Tarnanthi program is due to be announced in August 2019.

Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art
October 18 – 27
agsa.sa.gov.au

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